“I need help, please.”

I need help, please was a bit of expressive language that some good teacher or therapist helped our son with autism to use years ago.

For a person like our son, navigating an array of impairments like fine motor and personal care skills, the request is vital for opening a bottle of juice or getting to the bathroom on time.  (Of course he also learned to use it to enlist mom and dad for remedial action; I need help, please could signal a wardrobe change or a bathroom cleanup.)

It’s a sweet phrase in our family life.  It’s entered that volume of cute things the kids used to say, so my wife and I might raise our voice to a childlike tenor and say it if we can’t  find some item around the house.

But it came to mind in a more serious context this week when I asked a clergy friend about his Easter service at a residential care facility.

He shrugged and said, Well, there aren’t that many there to attend because they don’t have enough staff to house the population they used to.

help

From here.  They need help, too.

I need help, please.

People with special needs need family caregivers.

Family caregivers need professional allies in public and private agencies.

Public and private agencies need good human and financial resources to support individual and family needs.

The need for help is broad, but energy, money, time, staff, space, love and other resources can be in short supply; either hard to find or quickly exhausted and slow to replenish.

It’s a tough and perennial problem, even for the ultimate caregiver,

And Jesus said to them, “The harvest is plentiful, but the laborers are few. Therefore pray earnestly to the Lord of the harvest to send out laborers into his harvest.”  (Luke 10:2)

A dish best served with a smiley-face flower

The news is that agency staffing issues will delay our son with autism’s move to a group home (which seemed imminent about ten minutes ago) until mid-October.

Meanwhile, he’s descended upon us with increased nagging and bargaining for his Christmas list (yes, he starts early).  Mom and Dad are both on the ragged edge right now after bouts of illness and long work hours, so the din of his demands is a mental and emotional pummeling.

Yesterday we began to dish up a big ol’ plate of vengeance.  He came home from his day program with this very sweet guide to respectful communications:

20170824_173707THINK Before You Speak

T – is it True?

H – is it Helpful?

I – is it Important?

N – is it Necessary?

K – is it Kind?

BTW we stipulate that this is sound advice, not just for empathy-impaired people with autism but also for married couples, workplace relationships, social media, etc. etc. etc.  The world could be a much better place – Do not let any unwholesome talk come out of your mouths, but only what is helpful for building others up according to their needs, that it may benefit those who listen. (Ephesians 4:29, The New Testament)

And yes, that’s a rack of his daily meds at the bottom of the picture.  I’m so tired that I gave up on the photo cropping function and I don’t much care.

So we used this against him with great delight,

Joey:  Be a good boy there will be presents?

Hateful parents:  Joey, is it NECESSARY to talk about presents today?

Joey:  When it’s winter there will be presents.

Atrocious parents:  Joey, is it HELPFUL to talk about this before the snow comes?

Joey:  When the snow comes there will be presents.

Should-be-arrested-and-executed-parents:  Joey, is it KIND to keep talking about presents?

Hey, you find respite where you can get it.  That’s care giving.  And it makes even a smiley faced flower stink some days.