Autism and Covid-19 Strategies

This is a good resource from a professional in the special education field.

From the larger article, which is well worth your time if you have school aged kids with special needs:

So, your home is not just your home now-a-days, it’s your child’s classroom, your office, the playground, the dining hall, the sleep space, and everything in between. Do you want to prevent your home from becoming a mad house? Do you want to keep some sense of structure?! If so, then you need to SSOAR. SSOAR stands for:

S: Structure

S: Schedule

O: Organization

A: Accountability

R: Routine

Without SSOAR, it is more likely than not that your house will be a stressful, unorganized place where it will be very difficult for any of the family members to thrive – including you!

From all my years of teaching, I can tell you that all kids, especially those with special needs, NEED a daily schedule and routine. They thrive off of predictability and knowing what is expected of them. Without a daily schedule and routine they feel lost and confused.

This is why teachers LOVE charts! There are so many types of charts that can be beneficial to your child. Children need to be taught that although they are having school in the home setting now, they must still follow rules, have responsibilities, and strive to reach goals.

Below is a list of charts that you can use at home and can be beneficial to creating SSOAR for you child…

There are all kinds of useful tips for activities and resources you can create at home. With the coming school year still an iffy proposition for kids and caregivers alike, I hope this is useful.

Special Ed Distance Learning

I could be glib and suggest that any effort to communicate across special needs is a form of distance learning.

But Special Education presents challenges in the best of times, and even more with the school closures due to Covid-19.

Our local news aired a good feature on this. It gets beyond lamenting the hardship to show some of the creative efforts to keep Special Ed going over distance. The needed collaboration of family and school comes into focus, and maybe that’s one of the silver linings of our Covid-19 cloud. As one Sioux Falls teacher explains,

For my students who are more significantly impacted and have those significant disabilities, a lot of the time the parents are the ones working one on one with their child doing the things that I have assigned, but they’re really the ones that are really providing those interventions, through my specialized instruction that I’m providing them and the tools that I’m giving them.

It’s all individualized based on what the family needs, for what is working for their family, and where families are at. So if families are feeling overwhelmed and their focusing on the mental and physical health of their family, then that’s what I’m stressing, first and foremost, before anything academic.

I think it safe to say that family caregivers are always essential personnel, albeit unpaid and unable to be laid off even if we wanted a furlough (which some days sounds super attractive).

The news segment reports the painful reality that sometimes the family caregiver is the only one on the job. As one disability rights advocate relates,

We’ve represented a couple families who have had issues with schools not providing services, not providing the related services like speech and physical therapy and occupational therapy, and so we’ve worked with the parent and the school to create a dialogue and support the parent, so that the school understood their responsibilities to provide services.

I’ve shared here that we are empty nest, with the school days behind us. But hearing reports like this one lights up the old feelings, and our hearts go out to families still on that leg of the care giving journey.

Keep at it. Even with the gaps and failures, personal or public, you’re the best resource to those in your care.

Workplace impact of care giving

Good quick read at ThinkAdvisor.  It won’t surprise you if you’re a caregiver. But I hope it reaches you before you get to the point at which I found myself a few years ago.

…approximately 68% of working parental and spousal caregivers said they were subject to at least one of eight different effects on their jobs because of providing care to a loved one.

There is a link to the full Government Accountability Office report, which includes this graph of the eight workplace effects,

Caregiving workplace impact GAO

Raising our son with autism piled up stress over the years, and in a job which required intense people work and difficult decisions, I began to falter.  I suffered a number of these effects,

  • Care giving situations made me come in late, leave early or miss work altogether on a regular basis.
  • “Leave of absence” and “left work entirely” merged in a catastrophic case of burnout.  The 24/7 stress of workplace and care giving demands led to poor decision making and lack of energy at work, eventually diagnosed as depression and off the charts anxiety.
  • Although I received some kind help that got us through and got me back into the workforce, the financial fallout is still with us.

My advice from hindsight is to trust your instincts.  Don’t try to “fake” or “tough” your way through when you sense you’re in trouble.

When you know that “this isn’t working,” initiate adjustments.  Talk to your employer about the situation – a change of shift, department, location or even position within the organization might be helpful.  Reduced travel time, better synchronization with family schedules and other time impacts might be available.

Begin to crunch numbers and, if you’re married, get into a substantive discussion with your spouse.  I was so ashamed of what I was feeling that I tried to “handle it” myself – working as a couple might have generated solutions that I missed.  What changes of income are needed?  If more, what can your situation tolerate in terms of more hours or travel?  If income must come down, what can be cut out of current spending to accommodate the change?  What options, if any, does your spouse have on the money front?

Don’t make major decisions in the midst of emotional upheaval and don’t make them alone.

Value and stand up for your insights when you know you’re right.  Caregivers get used to being flexible and not insisting on our way in order to roll with the needs of others.  But sometimes we need to draw lines and make decisions for the family good.  It’s too easy to back down and do what we think will keep things “calm.”  All we do is create a ticking time bomb emotionally, financially, in relationally and, if working, professionally.

Yes, follow the constant advice to “take care of yourself.”  I know, I know… I heard and ignored it too.  Eat right, get sleep, exercise and nurture your mind and spirit.  Seek God’s presence – but watch out for magical thinking.  You know, “If I pray hard enough or make enough sacrifices, God will fix this.”  God will help you to endure and will guide you, but the “fixes” will often involve uncomfortable commitments and actions.  Make the right choices, guided by the moral teaching you claim to follow, rather than making compromises that temporarily ease your stress.

It’s never been the position of this blog to lecture you from a point of expertise.  So I hope that sharing my profound failures is a useful way to reach out and help.  Please take good care of yourself – those in your care need you to be you.

A way to pray WITH differently abled people

People of faith pray for those in our care, but can experience frustration when we seek the intimacy of praying with them.  The communication barriers between us can sink even simple conversation, let alone deeper dives like prayer.

I follow a gent in the UK who tweets as Disability&Jesus ( @DisabilityJ ).  He’s an advocate for inclusion and accessibility in churches.  He also promotes and participates in a website called An Ordinary Office.  “Office” here is used in a church context, meaning the marking of different times of day with prayer.

The site provides three formats to include differently abled people in the same prayers:

  • Makaton, a picture system (in some ways similar to PECS)
  • Text for reading
  • Audio

Here’s a screen shot from the Makaton version of Morning Prayer,

Makaton Prayer

Again, the site offers this same prayer is available in text and audio to include as many as possible in worship.

Of course it is worth remembering the very intuitive aspect of prayer; a person with special needs may well appreciate and benefit from your offering of prayers in which s/he doesn’t seem to be participating.

Like everything else in care giving, prayer will require persistent experimentation.  No one method will work with all people.

But cheers for the folks who offer An Ordinary Office.  They’ve come up with an accessible means to gather people of differing abilities in common prayer.

Be a voice while waiting for a voice

APRIL IS AUTISM AWARENESS MONTH

A mother with considerable language skill shares about coming to terms with her daughter’s autism:  

As a speaker of English, Italian, French and Russian, the fact that my daughter did not have speech was a constant source of despair…Yes, I still find myself hoping that one day my daughter will speak to me and tell me all about what it’s like be autistic, but for now, I can wait.

The mom makes use of her local newspaper to share insight into autism and the needs of family caregivers.  Being a voice for those in our care and for caregivers can spread not only awareness but opportunities for support and compassion:

Without a support group, I had no guidance on how to deal with issues created by my daughter’s condition in public, so I did the best I could to be honest and take responsibility.

When a stranger would scold my daughter or shout at her for behaving inappropriately in public, I would say, “I’m sorry. My daughter has autism. We meant no offense.”

I didn’t know how people would react, and I was surprised by the response I got. Often the person would say, “I’m sorry. I didn’t know.”

But sometimes they would say, “I have three grandchildren with autism,” or “My niece and nephew have autism,”or “My best friend’s son has severe ADHA and is on the spectrum.”

On at least one occasion, a complete stranger came up to me afterwards,, and told me about a member of their family with a disability.

There are a lot of us out there, and if you follow the news on autism, there are more of us every day.

Often we would take a few minutes to talk about the difficulties involved with rearing a child with a disability and the stress, not just about behavior, but also of not knowing where they will be developmentally in 10 years, or 20 years, or after you’re gone.

I learned that I wasn’t alone.

Recently, a group of us in Yankton formed our own “Mothers of Disabled Children” support group. It’s small, and we’ve only met a couple of times, but I already look forward to hearing about what’s going on with the other moms and their kids — without judgement.

It is a great example of communication with the community, both in the happenstance encounters she describes and in the intentional formation of groups and use of local information sources.

 

Rules of Engagement

APRIL IS AUTISM AWARENESS MONTH.

Yeah, this post’s title is a military term.  Rules of engagement tell you when you’re allowed to shoot back.

Sometimes care giving feels like combat, albeit in non-lethal form.

One particular battle is the effort to engage people with autism in collaborative behavior.  I was going to say meaningful behavior but that assumes that people with autism are absorbed in meaningless behavior on their own, which is not true.  Their behavior has great meaning to them, even if we can’t always crack the code and understand it.  And who knows, maybe they perceive our antics as meaningless.

OK, back to collaborative.

Our 25 year old son with autism, Joey, lives in a warm and supportive group home here in town.  Our custom is to pick him up on Sunday afternoons for dinner and an overnight with us.

We try to engage him in play, household activities or just chit chat.  None of these have ever been among his favorite things.  And as we shared a few weeks ago, his priority right now is to negotiate and nag about an unavailable form of entertainment he used to enjoy on his own.

So there’s some creative combat as we try to get him to say or do anything besides chanting “VCR will be here soon.”

Music usually engages him, but he’s figured out that playing tunes on our computers or phones is our effort to stifle the VCR negotiation.  So he either covers his ears and stomps away, whines “No MUSIC” or, wonder of wonders, forms a sentence to say, “I want quiet, please.”  Which is collaborative communication, except it leaves us all staring at one another non-collaboratively.

So I ran and got some picture books from our years of accumulated kids’ books.  We got a few smiles out of him with our funny character voices,  but he would not sit on the couch with us to look at them, let alone read with us.

So Melissa continued to try an engage him in talk or music while I huffed away to empty the dishwasher (does he think I’m engaged in meaningful behavior when I do that?  Do I?)

Then a little light bulb fizzed on over my head.  I said, “Hey Joe, come in here with dad.”

He glowered at me.

“Come on and help dad,” I chirped.  “This will be FUN!”

He uncurled from the couch and stood looking at me.  I indicated the silverware drawer.

20190331_213344“Help dad put these away.”

I handed him a butter knife.  Lo and behold, he put it in the slot with the other knives.

“Good job with the knives,” I oversold the moment.  Then I gave him a salad fork.

He put it in with the other smaller forks.  That was impressive, as he could have just mixed it up with the larger dinner forks.

I commenced praising him and called out my delight to Melissa.  I was going to move on to spoons, but he made an annoyed face, sounded off with his go-to word, “NOOOO,” and returned to the couch.

We counted the night a success.  Caring for people with autism requires rejoicing in small victories, connections that might seem trivial in what we perceive as normal life.

We’re still refusing to chase after another VCR.  But we are adopting a puppy.  And we’re provisionally excited, because Joey made eye contact and whispered “Yes” when we told him about it and Melissa showed him pictures like this one:

20190330_130429

This little guy is named Henry.  We hope he will help us with some fun engagement with Joey.  That is, once Henry’s done eating Melissa’s glasses.

So, what forms of engagement reach the one(s) in your care?  Always open to new tactics.  What works with one person with autism doesn’t necessarily reach the next one.

Very often, the most loving care is to keep showing up, trying again or trying something new.

And sometimes just showing up and letting them be.

Are you a family caregiver or know someone who is?  Consider getting or gifting our little book for this Autism Awareness Month.

 

Maybe Next Year

Growing up in L.A., I was a fan of the Los Angeles Angels when they were a brand-new American League expansion team. When I was a kid, they played in the stadium named for the “real” team: the Dodgers.

But in my childhood, they were a “maybe next year” team. Maybe next year they would win more games than they lost. Maybe next year they would climb up from the bottom of the standings.

We have a “maybe next year” tree by the street in front of our house. We needed a tree out there to block some of the summer sun that routinely fried our lawn. We also craved fall color, so when a landscaper showed us pictures of a maple called a “Fall Fiesta,” we said, “Wow, look at all those fiery leaves! Put one in right now!” So he did. And all the budding leaves fell off, and the tree went dormant. We looked at our bare little tree all winter, praying that dormant was something different from dead. The tree budded in the spring. Of course, it hardly cast any shade, little thing that it was.

img_20161021_173959

The tree done good!

The next year was better. There was noticeable fresh growth on top. It grew taller. Its leaves seemed fuller. It didn’t shield the lawn from the sun, but it cast a respectable shadow where the dog liked to pee on hot days. There were some deep red leaves in the mix for autumn. Each year adds.

Like waiting on a plant to bloom, taking care of an autistic person requires patient hope. Your heart, and maybe your mind, will break if you are into precise timelines. “Next September our kids will achieve ‘X’” must be held loosely. “X” might happen in October, or November, or the following spring, or September two years out, or not for a very long time.

Like hopelessly loyal sports fans or amateur gardeners, caregivers have to keep telling themselves, “Maybe next year.” And in the next year, or tomorrow, or a few seconds from now, a once-abandoned hope arrives as a surprise.

Gardeners like ourselves must learn and relearn “deferred gratification.” We might want to stick a stalk in the ground and see a tree the next day, and we want to think that one or two sit-downs with an exercise book will have our kid reading literature in time for kindergarten.

But when it comes to caring for someone with special needs, it is important to hold a goal patiently. If it is a good goal, it is worth holding onto in heart, mind, and habits over many seasons.

Like travelers using the four cardinal directions on a map, people who follow Jesus find spiritual orientation from three cardinal virtues: “faith, hope and love” (1 Corinthians 13:13 NIV). Hope keeps us looking to the horizon, to what’s next. We hope for what we do not see or have, but believe what can be out there. Hope allows us to act with purpose, believing that our efforts are worthwhile and taking us toward a good destination. It means long seasons of waiting, of doing the right stuff over and over even when a desired result isn’t coming into view.

When we come to terms with hope, we find that it isn’t really about a particular event, thing, or outcome, but it’s about coming face-to-face with the one who is calling us forward.

Edited and shared by the publisher, from my book.

Because

I’ve been whining about the sorting of post-care-giving issues, haven’t I?

OK, here comes a celebration of the freedom that seeps back into life.

Hatch 2018Today I’m roasting Hatch Chiles.  Most people are all about pumpkin products as summer turns to autumn.  But these beauties from New Mexico make the season for me.  Wish I could share the aroma with you.

It is not a fast process, but I can take my time on a blessedly slow Saturday morning.  Did I mention the aroma?

I’m not having to watch over my shoulder, or listen for booms and bangs, or make sure someone isn’t too close to the oven.

Because today I don’t have to.

Last night we had friends over for some prayer and Bible study, and we sat out on our recently cleaned deck because it was a lovely evening and because nobody had to stay in the house on safety patrol, or to administer meds, or clean up a bathroom, or or or or anything else.

Because we didn’t have to.

If you’re in the midst of care giving (as we were for more than two decades), savor your respite time.  It is a break from what you’re in all the time, but it is also a taste of something that is coming.

Because what you’re doing today will not be forever.

The Book of Common Prayer captures what I’m trying to say, albeit in the cosmic sense,

Almighty God, who after the creation of the world didst rest
from all thy works and sanctify a day of rest for all thy
creatures: Grant that we, putting away all earthly anxieties,
may be duly prepared for the service of thy sanctuary, and
that our rest here upon earth may be a preparation for the
eternal rest promised to thy people in heaven; through Jesus
Christ our Lord. Amen.

 

Leaf me alone!

adult alone autumn brick

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Leaf me alone is ethnic humor that could once pass between friends of different backgrounds.  It was cool when my Mexican American friend used it 40 (are you kidding me?  Forty?) years ago in our Army barracks in (then West) Germany (quite a history lesson here, eh, kids?)

When my friend John C. (whom I annoyed by calling him Juan Carlos) was having a bad day, he would exaggerate a stereotypical Chicano accent and tell the world, Leaf me alone, esay.

It’s Wednesday as I type this.  Hump Day, midweek, and, deep down inside, a caregiver somewhere is screaming at the cosmos.  Leaf me alone, esay.

My morning meditation turned up that very scream, aimed at no less than God, albeit in an ancient Hebrew version:

Take your affliction from me; I am worn down by the blows of your hand…Turn your gaze from me, that I may be glad again, before I go my way and am no more. (Psalm 39)

While our insides might scream Leaf me alone and Turn your gaze from me, family caregivers are good at smiling for the outside world and thanking people for well intended compliments like You must be a very special person for God to entrust you with this.

Some friends are perceptive enough to make a face and say, Man, I’d go crazy if I had to do that.  Or, as one counselor told a family caregiver, You’re very skilled at living in hell.

I’ve noticed on doctor visits that the “depression inventory” forms the nurses sometimes require include feeling like you would be better off dead alongside the more direct any thoughts of harming yourself?

The former is more common.  It’s not necessarily a threat of suicide but is an inner dialogue by which overwhelmed people say leaf me alone.

That doesn’t mean we’re just “venting.”  It is horrible to be in the place where life (or at least our place in it) is no longer viewed as a gift to enjoy.  Such thoughts can indicate the need for medical help, and we shouldn’t be ashamed of that.  Care giving takes a toll.

No great advice for you here.  You already know the responses… things like

  • Take respite.  I know, I know, IF it’s available.  Which it sometimes ain’t.  Like a prison inmate, you might have to create it in your own head.
  • Have friendships/activities not tied up in care giving issuesLeaf me alone is about the grind, not about all relationships and activities.  Some are welcome – so welcome them.
  • Try to prepare and eat healthy foods.  I can tell you that I’ve become a decent cook over the years.  It is more work but if you fight off the urge to microwave junk and get on with preparing more fresh stuff, you’ll feel better and you’ll find some fun and good mental activity in it.  And talking about recipe ideas with others is a great way to keep conversations from wallowing in care giving stuff.
  • Exercise – even if just walking the dog around the block.  As Mrs. Obama said, Get up and move.  Get your blood flowing and your heart and lungs working.  Turn some of the boring household chores into opportunities to stretch and flex yourself.  If you normally reach with one hand to do a task, try using the other hand.  If you tend to favor one knee while kneeling to pick up stuff, bend the other one.  Your whole system will benefit from little efforts like these.  Taking on one resented chore each day can give a sense of accomplishment, too.

I know – these things are hard to establish and maintain in many care giving situations.  But they are the antidotes to Leaf me alone, which was funny the way my friend said it but not funny in care giving.

Sprechen Sie my stuff?

Back in my Army days in Germany, I was sitting with some friends in a restaurant bar.  There was another American at another table, trying to pick up a German woman.

She didn’t speak much English, it was clear, so he attempted to connect by… getting louder.  As if raising his voice could overcome their lack of common language.

I ran into a couple of interesting articles today, each about building connection with people in our care.

In Getting Into Their Heads, Carol Bradley Bursack encourages caregivers to refrain from arguing with those in our care who live with dementia.  She encourages rolling with delusions where practical, building a bridge to the caree’s reality,  in one case buying a particular school’s class ring for her dad, who believed he’d lost his (he’d never had one in the first place).  She writes,

This is only one example of the effect of not arguing about “facts” with someone who has a different view of facts than you have. To someone with dementia, what they believe is just as true as what you and I believe to be true is to us.

She is quick to acknowledge that this is not always feasible, but still a tool to keep in our kit,

Sometimes…all we can do is try to comfort them and get them through to the next cycle. But why would we want to do that when we don’t have to? Isn’t it easier to agree that the sky is green that day than swear it’s blue? Who does it hurt?

A New York Times piece explores building social connection with people living with autism.  The two professors who combined on it are concerned that people assume limitations rather than explore possibilities:

Insisting that autistic people behave in ways that they are unable to can lead to feelings of learned helplessness, self-defeating thoughts and behaviors and, eventually, social withdrawal. As an autistic participant in one study explained: “I have been endlessly criticized about how different I looked, criticized about all kinds of tiny differences in my behavior. There’s a point where you say, ‘To hell with it, it’s impossible to please you people.’”

The danger of being assumed to be socially uninterested is especially acute for the roughly one-third of autistic people who do not use spoken language reliably. Like other autistic people, they behave in ways that get misinterpreted, and they may not be able to correct the record.

For all of us, whether we are socially motivated at any given time depends on much more than our innate predisposition for sociability. It also depends on how we’ve been treated in the past; our ability to tune out distracting sights, sounds, smells, thoughts and feelings; and the attitudes and behaviors of potential social partners.

They are articulating what many agencies call Person Centered Care.  We do well to learn the modes and means of social interaction that work for a particular person and build from there.

Our son with autism uses movie lines (especially lyrics from musicals) to reach out to others, and can be engaged in return by those who “learn his language.”  He is capable of expressive and receptive social communication, but not always on our expected terms.

So, like the GI at the German table, don’t just raise your voice.

Well, unless the person in your care likes yelling.