We’re being followed

Here’s a bit from Raising a Child With Autism, courtesy of the publisher,

I was more on top of weed-pulling in our first garden. I had the energy of youth, the pride of a new homeowner, and it seemed urgent. Likewise, in the early years of Joey’s life, we were young enough to run ourselves ragged trying to do everything: work on every skill and learning drill, coach him through every small task, try to keep him engaged, clean up after him, visit and consult every expert, and go to every seminar and meeting. As each year passed, we accepted more freedom just to say “no.” We accepted that there would be all kinds of needs and issues all the time.

We also learned more about depending upon others. I pay friends’ kids to pull my weeds these days. In raising a person with autism, there are free services and activities out in the community, and some for which you have to pay. Either way, there are good and competent folks who can enrich the life of a person who lives with autism.  

You can spend all of your time pulling weeds. You’ll have a nicer garden, a sore back, and a growing sense of futility. The job is never done.

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They helped me out of the hole.

A very insightful piece. She blogs more often about relationships but her insights here are VITAL to caregiver survival.

“If there’s anything I’ve learned during this season of my life, it’s that we all NEED people and that we weren’t made to be alone.”

ellielacey

Hi world,

It’s me, Ellie. I know it’s been a little while since I shared my thoughts on here but I am backkkk. Quite honestly there was a reason for my MIA-ness. I have been going through some things in my life over the past few months that were too personal and deep to share via online. Don’t worry, I wasn’t depressed or anything like that but the things that I was dealing with were too raw and personal to share online. I didn’t know how to verbalize them and I’m still not sure when, if or how those things will be shared on here. I’ll keep you posted 😉

I really wanted to share these things that I was going through with people who asked. People who I have been doing face to face life with, not the whole wide internet world. It can be such a positive thing…

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Strong mind, weak back

When advocating for our son’s placement in a group home, one of our arguments was our increasing age and the upcoming physical challenges of ’round the clock care for an adult with autism.

Now that he’s placed, our incredible wisdom is validated.

This week, Tim was diagnosed with something called “frozen shoulder.”  As the Mayo Clinic reveals,

Certain factors may increase your risk of developing frozen shoulder… People 40 and older… (Note: Tim’s about half past 40).

Even with Joey in a good group home, our age impinges on what we can do for him.  We just bought the new bed he needs, and Melissa’s call to the mattress place went something like,

My husband can come pick it up, but he’s got a shoulder thing.  Can someone there help him get the mattress on top of the van?  And can you tie it down for him?

Which is to say,

The Dignity of Risk

Tim had a chance to speak to the staff of a non-profit community support provider.  Many of the attendees wore blue in support of Autism Awareness Month.

ABS Blue April 2018It was a chance to remind these care giving allies how much they mean to families like ours.

Tim shared a story from our book, recounting how we threw a little party to offer a personal goodbye to one of our son’s music therapists before we moved to another state. He noted that educators, medical providers, therapists and all kinds of other direct support folks don’t hear from families unless and until something is wrong.  Our interactions tend to be steeped in bad news. We need to find ways to say thank you and, as the New Testament puts it, encourage one another and build one another up (1 Thessalonians 5:11).

As we shared in an earlier post, community support agencies have the heart and vision to provide all kinds of help to people with special needs and their families, but are hindered by lack of staff.  When Tim asked his audience what things families, churches, community groups and other neighbors could do to enhance their work, responses included

  • Identify people suited to care giving and encourage them to consider it as a career
  • Help the public understand the work of service providers and why they do it
  • Provide meaningful interactions and opportunities in the community for the people receiving services
  • Express gratitude to caregivers
  • Engage in advocacy work on behalf of community support agencies

One of the people present spoke of care giving as possessing the dignity of risk.  Caring for people with special needs means going down unfamiliar paths, trying out the untested, sometimes trusting intuition in opposition to common sense, and learning to center efforts on the person in our care instead of our own expectations of “what’s best.”

Families have this risk, dignity and all, dropped upon us when our loved one is diagnosed.  We accept the risk out of love and duty.

We are blessed when folks who don’t have to accept it choose the dignity of risk as a way of life.  May their tribe increase.

The harvest is plentiful, but the laborers are few. Therefore pray earnestly to the Lord of the harvest to send out laborers into his harvest.  (Luke 10:2)

Not another list

I know, I know, you try to chill with some time surfing the internet and you are bombarded with the 5 Things You Must Do and the 10 Things You Should Never Do and the 3 Things You Absolutely Must Stop Doing.

So many experts available to overhaul and repair our lives.

Bumped into a list this morning, but it’s good.  It’s not loaded with absolute, must, always, never or any of that arrogance.  Just four good ideas, especially if you’re not a caregiver but care about someone who is.

This one most resonated with me:

Time is the greatest gift. Many caregivers have told me that caregiving locks them into whirlwind daily routines of attending to others’ needs. Above all else, they miss time for themselves — to go to the salon or bank, read a book, clean the house or catch up on sleep. The greatest comfort you may offer is the gift of time. Offer to sit with care receivers while caregivers take a break. Pick up supplies for caregivers so they can stay home and relax. Try to make yourself available to listen as often as they need to vent.

Tony Gaines Starz

Yes, me (on the right) doing stupid guy stuff with a friend makes me a better caregiver.

Things you might consider small favors are solid gold to a caregiver.  YOU just being around can be a gift.  Even in the midst of a tornado of chores, an adult friend with whom to joke, whine, opinionate or otherwise have a peer level, non-care-giving interaction is a blessing.

Go check out the list of four suggestions.  You’ll find you have a lot to give by just being you.  And in caring for us caregivers, you are improving our peace, strength and focus to help those in our care.

 

Flurry of memories

20180414_132115Much of our region is shut in by a massive blizzard today.  The City of Sioux Falls is asking people to stay off of city streets, let alone risk country roads or the Interstates.

Now that we are empty nest, I find myself remembering the anxiety that would have accompanied this kind of day when we had our son at home.  Everything would be wrong and a potential meltdown: if the weather cancelled an anticipated outing; if it prevented fulfillment of a whim for some particular food that wasn’t in the house; if any daily routines were in disarray.

Boredom would make him edgy and mounting stress could issue in a seizure.  But he wouldn’t engage in activities we tried to share.  He’d generally vocalize some demand that was impossible to meet and his tension would escalate.

Today he’ll be in his group home.  He has his own room with a computer and movies in case he wants to be alone.  There are common spaces with things to do if he wants company.  And there are staff there with the residents doing what we used to do, and we are grateful.

Stressful days are not limited to snow days when it comes to autism and care giving.  School vacation or “in service” days, when routine is removed, can be walks through hell.

My respect goes out to all who are shut in today, be they people with special needs or their caregivers.  Whatever inconveniences and challenges most of us endure, they have an extra helping or two.

“I need help, please.”

I need help, please was a bit of expressive language that some good teacher or therapist helped our son with autism to use years ago.

For a person like our son, navigating an array of impairments like fine motor and personal care skills, the request is vital for opening a bottle of juice or getting to the bathroom on time.  (Of course he also learned to use it to enlist mom and dad for remedial action; I need help, please could signal a wardrobe change or a bathroom cleanup.)

It’s a sweet phrase in our family life.  It’s entered that volume of cute things the kids used to say, so my wife and I might raise our voice to a childlike tenor and say it if we can’t  find some item around the house.

But it came to mind in a more serious context this week when I asked a clergy friend about his Easter service at a residential care facility.

He shrugged and said, Well, there aren’t that many there to attend because they don’t have enough staff to house the population they used to.

help

From here.  They need help, too.

I need help, please.

People with special needs need family caregivers.

Family caregivers need professional allies in public and private agencies.

Public and private agencies need good human and financial resources to support individual and family needs.

The need for help is broad, but energy, money, time, staff, space, love and other resources can be in short supply; either hard to find or quickly exhausted and slow to replenish.

It’s a tough and perennial problem, even for the ultimate caregiver,

And Jesus said to them, “The harvest is plentiful, but the laborers are few. Therefore pray earnestly to the Lord of the harvest to send out laborers into his harvest.”  (Luke 10:2)

Sink your teeth into this

A dental hygienist and care giver to a son with autism did a bit of field research on what could help make a visit to the dentist a success for the child and family.

She found five factors, with communication central to the whole effort.  She visualized it this way:

Autism dental

From the linked article.

Note the importance of Parent carer confidence.  There’s the saying that you should be your own advocate when it comes to your medical care.  Caregivers have to advocate for those who rely on our help.  In the case of dental visits, the author of the study found that

Parents expressed a lack of confidence in approaching the dentist when issues arose. They often assumed that the dentist’s education had provided enough training to understand and support individuals who struggled attending dental examinations. For those parents confident enough to ask for minor changes to meet their child’s individual needs, they reported that these requests were often met with reluctance. Therefore, despite their best efforts, dental visits were largely unsuccessful.
Dental teams that took time to respond flexibly to parental requests for support had more positive experiences. Check-ups were also positive when the whole dental team became involved in the care of the child. This was demonstrated by one dental team who discovered a boy’s love for washing machines. There was a washing machine at the practice so the receptionists would take him to see it if the dentist was running late, or after his check-up.
Helpful strategies included providing information on what to expect before a check-up and making thorough notes so parents did not have to repeat themselves at every appointment. This continuity before and after a check-up was really valued by participating families.
When we express the likes, dislikes and needs of those in our care, we find that we can make allies.  Sure, there are people and places that lack flexibility.  It’s up to us to seek out and open up the practices that are supportive.

 

Waiting for the other one to drop.

I went over to our son’s group home to pick him up for an overnight here.  Nice evening, got his hair cut, had lots of pizza with friends, the good things in life.

But the big news is what happened when I picked him up.  A staff person at the house said, “Joey, your dad’s here.  Get ready to go.”

Lo and behold, Joey went into his room and came out a moment later HAVING PUT ON HIS OWN SHOES.

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Yeah, those black ones on the top of the pile!  They were on his feet!  All by themselves or something!

That’s something we weren’t able to get him to do for 23 years, and in just a few weeks of living with a bit of independence (and housemates who won’t be manipulated into doing it all for him) he can “shoe” himself.

And that’s not all.  He’s using pronouns and grammar more appropriately.

Most of all, he’s smiling a whole lot on these visits.  He’s not disoriented by changes in routine like he used to be.

Next week’s his 24th birthday.  Looking forward to having him over for a celebration.

One week at HIS house

Our son just accomplished his first week in a staffed group home.

He’s here at home our place (yes, we’re trying to call the new house HIS home) to spend the night.  This afternoon and evening will include a haircut by his fave stylist and a pizza party with her family.

The week was a case of “no news is good news” since not hearing from the staff meant no problems.

20171208_135432When I went to pick him up at HIS HOUSE (I must keep practicing this) he was comfortable in HIS greenish recliner ($50 at a used hotel furniture place).  I simply told him that we were going to mom-and-dad’s house for a haircut and pizza with his stylist and her kids.

He came along just fine – although he was a bit confused by my car sitting in HIS driveway.  He turned toward the garage to look for the house van.  He’s already into all of the routines of HIS NEW HOUSE.

Once at our place, he got in a hug from mom.  He was a bit miffed that the Christmas tree is down, but that didn’t last long.

Now he’s taking a short nap in his old bed (with a cushy new blanket he got for Christmas.  Friends provided a second cushy new blanket for HIS house and it even goes with HIS drapes.

This is going well.

Of course there’s the trite line from the old Westerns, It’s quiet.  TOO quiet.