No, you’re not crazy.

Well, maybe you are.  But since care giving puts a whuppin’ on body, heart and mind over time there’s no surprise that our lives reflect the damage.

I’m currently reading Being Mortal but Atul Gawande.  The author is a surgeon who also writes outstanding prose that invites the lay person to look at medical issues and medical professionals to look at the human impact of their work.

Yesterday, I read his description of an adult daughter caring for her father,

Taking care of a debilitated, elderly person in our medicalized era is an overwhelming combination of the technological and the custodial… The burdens for today’s caregiver have actually increased from what they would have been a century ago.  Shelley had become a round-the-clock concierge/chauffeur/schedule manager/medication-and-technology troubleshooter, in addition to cook/maid/attendant, not to mention income earner.  Last minute cancellations by health aides and changes in medical appointments played havoc with her performance at work, and everything played havoc with her emotions at home… 

She felt her sanity slipping.

Misery (or is it madness?) loves company, and I was reminded of what I wrote in the intro to Raising A Child With Autism,

Maybe you are an amateur trying to be caregiver, therapist, clinician, advocate, mommy, daddy and everything else to a loved one living with autism. You feel like a lone idiot with a leaky hose when the job needs a landscape company.

So if you’re out there feeling depressed, or enraged, or exhausted, or or or or… just repeat after Dr. Sheldon Cooper:

sheldon not crazy

Flashing before my eyes

Not my life, but my son’s life.  That’s what flashing before my eyes.

Today we have the meeting to set up his move to a group home.  All of the staff will be there, both the folks from his day program and from the house where he will live.

It’s a positive thing, of course, something for which we’ve (my wife and I) waited for a long time.

I can’t speak for her feelings, and I can only guess at our son’s, so I’ll shift to first person here.

I realize that my role in my son’s life is not over, but much of what I can do and shape is.  I’ve formed what I can in his life, second guessed myself to the point of agony, been critiqued and judged plenty from without, as well as encouraged and supported at precious points along the way.

I can look back on…

 

JOEY Yucaipa

 

…who Joey was…

 

 

Daves mom and joe

 

 

…who he’s become…

 

 

 

20170723_110957

 

 

…and ponder who he’ll be.

 

 

 

 

Something of me travels with him, of course.  And I pray that it is whatever is true, whatever is honourable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is pleasing, whatever is commendable (Philippians 4:8).  God knows and every day reminds me that there’s plenty of me that needs to be ignored and forgotten, and I can only pray that little of that drags along with Joey.

So a new leg of the journey commences, over territory we’ve not been and over which we’ll have ever diminishing control.  But ain’t that life.

An old priest I knew always included a warning in his message at the baptism of a child.  You (parents) know that you’re handing your child over to God now.  You’re no longer in charge of the outcomes.

As my life flashes before my eyes, and Joey’s plays across my imagination, I’ll trust that warning, and know that all of our lives are in the hands of the One who’s cared for us beyond all deserving.

 They will declare,  “The Lord is just!  He is my rock!  There is no evil in him!”  (Psalm 92:15, NLT)

A dish best served with a smiley-face flower

The news is that agency staffing issues will delay our son with autism’s move to a group home (which seemed imminent about ten minutes ago) until mid-October.

Meanwhile, he’s descended upon us with increased nagging and bargaining for his Christmas list (yes, he starts early).  Mom and Dad are both on the ragged edge right now after bouts of illness and long work hours, so the din of his demands is a mental and emotional pummeling.

Yesterday we began to dish up a big ol’ plate of vengeance.  He came home from his day program with this very sweet guide to respectful communications:

20170824_173707THINK Before You Speak

T – is it True?

H – is it Helpful?

I – is it Important?

N – is it Necessary?

K – is it Kind?

BTW we stipulate that this is sound advice, not just for empathy-impaired people with autism but also for married couples, workplace relationships, social media, etc. etc. etc.  The world could be a much better place – Do not let any unwholesome talk come out of your mouths, but only what is helpful for building others up according to their needs, that it may benefit those who listen. (Ephesians 4:29, The New Testament)

And yes, that’s a rack of his daily meds at the bottom of the picture.  I’m so tired that I gave up on the photo cropping function and I don’t much care.

So we used this against him with great delight,

Joey:  Be a good boy there will be presents?

Hateful parents:  Joey, is it NECESSARY to talk about presents today?

Joey:  When it’s winter there will be presents.

Atrocious parents:  Joey, is it HELPFUL to talk about this before the snow comes?

Joey:  When the snow comes there will be presents.

Should-be-arrested-and-executed-parents:  Joey, is it KIND to keep talking about presents?

Hey, you find respite where you can get it.  That’s care giving.  And it makes even a smiley faced flower stink some days.

 

Killed by life

The idea of grieving the living isn’t new to me.  A grief counselor opened it up at an autism conference I attended years ago.  There are crossovers between disability and death – dreams are lost, so are familiar comforts and joys.

Today I bumped into a good article on this topic, from the American Academy of Bereavement.  In a 2015 piece entitled Unconventional Grief: Grieving Someone Alive, AAB shares good insight,

jesus-weptThis form of grief, just like grieving someone who is deceased, does not change the level of attachment to the person. Simply, this person is no longer acting how they were before and have had a dramatic shift in personality… Unlike when someone dies, you are unlikely to experience positive emotions while grieving someone alive. When someone passes, you are surrounded by the comfort of their loved ones and are often able to look at the joy of their life. This rarely happens with unconventional or ambiguous grief. Just like when someone dies, you are likely to be overcome with sadness. However, the reminder of your sadness is constant…

The article focuses on sudden change in an adult, such as drug addiction or the onset of mental illness.  For caregivers of children with developmental disabilities, the loss isn’t so much who the person used to be, but who you dreamed of them becoming.  There’s grief either way.

Read the whole thing.  There are some positive suggestions for the grieving caregiver, including this one which has been so true of living with our son’s autism,

Open yourself up to change. One of the hardest parts of grieving someone alive is that you are forced to accept a changed relationship that you do not want. It may be difficult for you to look on a loved one in a different life, but you may be able to experience a rewarding relationship with them in new ways than before. Focusing on finding joy in your new relationship will help keep your mental state positive rather than gloomy.

Finding joy in Joey-as-Joey, rather than as the Joey of our daydreams, has been an essential care giving tool and its own reward.

And Jesus opened his mouth and taught them, saying:  “Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.  Blessed are those who mourn, for they shall be comforted.”  (Matthew 5:2-4)

 

What’s left

We are almost sitcom laugh track worth ’round here today.

Joey, our 23 year old with autism, has a nasty cough and is home in a NyQuil haze.  He’s intoning Disney movie lines in a voice that sounds like the audio of a slow motion replay.

Melissa (mom/caregiver) is suffering from a double shot – one shot of staying up all night to care for Joey and the other a shot of recurring pain from a chronic illness.  She’s closed her eyes for a few minutes (btw I think she’s pretty when she sleeps but that’s just editorializing and so I’ll move on).

Tyrion Aftermath-of-the-attack

Tyrion Lannister visits our living room today.  From here.

I (Tim – dad/caregiver) am sittin’ here typing this while my eyes keep closing and head drops on the verge of sleep.  I have the day off but I’m sleep deprived from some kind of phantom leg pain (possible arthritis although disc problem is another one the doctor threw in to consider).

We are all beat up in one way or another, but not by one another.  If anything, there’s a tenderness in the house that is surprising given how cranky pain can make any one of us.

When all else fails (and hey, what doesn’t when you’re a caregiver?), your kindness remains a gift to those in your care.  On days when all of you are hurting, you find out that everyone in the household is a care giver and a recipient of care at the same time.

Letting another’s head rest on your shoulder is a successful intervention, “How are you?” is deep communication and “Sit down, I’ll get that for you” is heroic service.

Sometimes what’s left is you, and you’re plenty.

I sent a prayer request to a friend in the midst of our family sick day, and what he sent back says it pretty well,

Praise be to the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of compassion and the God of all comfort, who comforts us in all our troubles, so that we can comfort those in any trouble with the comfort we ourselves receive from God. For just as we share abundantly in the sufferings of Christ, so also our comfort abounds through Christ. (2 Corinthians 1:3-5)

Reading while waiting

clock

Pic from here.

On this end, we’re still waiting on a new meeting date to get our son’s residential placement going.

This morning while waiting for the bus to his day program, I ran into a young woman’s blog piece about living with her brother and his autism.

What she describes gave me a brief shiver of memory.  We endured some of this stuff for years.  Yes, our son has come a long way; no, that doesn’t erase the gut reaction when reading

First of all, nobody truly recognises how tough it is merely to care for someone who needs assistance with everything. Stephen is 6 ft. 2 and has to be bathed, washed and nappies changed. Physically, and mentally, it is downright exhausting. His sleep schedule is non-existent and his meltdowns are unpredictable. His self-harming happens unexpectedly and can last for indeterminate amounts of time. These are the children you don’t see in autism awareness adverts; headbutting walls, smacking their heads, nipping and biting and scratching. It is the most draining thing to devote hours upon hours simply trying to prevent someone from hitting themselves, and a task that seems so stupid and meaningless in nature when you know that, come a few hours’ time, it will simply happen again.

And the decades between the young woman and our aging (aged?) selves evaporate as she describes our common worry,

I am 19; I should spend my days fretting about having enough money to go out at the weekend and passing exams to get my degree. My biggest fear about the future should be whether I’m going to achieve my dream job, what countries I will travel to. Instead, I worry about what will become of my brother. He understands nothing of pain and manipulation and danger. My brother is so bearing on the spectrum that he needs round the clock care, and when I am the only one left to do that, how will I cope?

OK, back to waiting.

Are we awake or dreaming (or both?)

Well, here it is…

Joey move invite

For those new to the game, ISP is Individualized Service Plan.  Or Ineffective Stammering Parent.  Or something like that.

Yes, that’s this week, so there won’t be much blogging going on.  The wheels or gears or whatever are in motion for our son with autism to move into a group home setting.

There’s exhilaration.  The daily chores and crises pulling me away from every thought or pleasant experience are about to end.  No more watching the clock when out to a meal or social engagement.

But there’s worry, too.  I (Tim) am having dreams in which Joey gets lost and I’m running around trying to find him, hindered by various circumstances.  I am going to miss his presence in ways I can’t even anticipate.

Your prayers and cheerleading are welcome.

Taking the show on the road

Sunday I preached at a church in Watertown, South Dakota.  That’s about 2 hours north of us.

Because our son with autism has had a string of sleepless (read active, boisterous) nights, and my wife has been up with him so I could sleep enough to work, I decided to chance some chaos and take Joey on the road with me so Melissa could sleep.

The risk is that Joey is an excellent traveler but a terrible arrive-er.  He’s fine on a long car ride or even a plane flight.  He loves looking out windows-in-motion.  But once at the destination, he starts saying, Go back to Joey’s house and doesn’t want to take part in the doings at the new location, at least while it’s strange to him.

On the way up to Watertown, I played music he likes.  He’s a big fan of The Guess Who.  He likes all kinds of music but he’s especially attentive to vocals, and Burton Cummings is no slouch.  I’ve had this Guess Who collection to play in the car for him for more than ten years.  It was important when we moved halfway across the country back in 2004.

20170723_100133Soooo… we arrive at church and Joey is calm but not social.  One person said, Joey, you can sit down wherever you want.  Which of course led to him sitting in the pastor’s seat, unwilling to budge.  The folks weren’t bothered, and they got me a matching chair.

Joey was calm throughout the service and endured listened to my sermon.  I sat next to him when other people offered readings or prayers, and he was responsive to my requests that he use indoor voice when others were speaking.

20170723_110957After the service, he wasn’t interested in visiting, even when pastry appeared.

<–This picture presents Joey’s version of what church-types call fellowship.

Again, he wasn’t agitated.  He just looked out onto the sunny day while the rest of us swilled coffee.

He was patient while I signed a copy of my book for a church member and visited with folks for a few minutes.

I was blessed by one person’s account of having worked at a state facility.  She pointed out the great changes in a very short span of years – it wasn’t long ago that such facilities were, by design, a way for families to keep members with special needs out of sight and out of mind.  Now, family caregivers are more active participants and advocates in the lives of their loved ones, even those who are in institutional settings.

I offered to take Joey to lunch, and listed some of his favorite foods to help him choose.  He resonated with quesadillas, so off to Guadalajara we drove.

20170723_114044Here’s Joey downing some tortilla chips while waiting for the quesadilla to come.  Glad he was in bright primary blue – he fit right into the restaurant’s decor.

We had a very nice lunch and drive back, with more Guess Who.

All in all, it was a sweet day.  Mom got some overdue and well deserved rest; dad and son had an enjoyable road trip.  The fear of chaos didn’t pan out and a few minor misadventures at church were more humorous than anxious.

In case you’re wondering, here’s Joey’s favorite Guess Who track,

Loneliness

Just caught some stats from across the pond,

  • Research by Sense has shown that up to 50% of disabled people will be lonely on any given day…
  • A report by Carers UK revealed that 8 out of 10 carers have felt lonely or isolated as a result of looking after a loved one.

That’s right, half of people with special needs experience loneliness in the course of a day.  But on top of that, 80% of those who care for them feel lonely or isolated – and care giving is cited as the source of the emotion.

We get that here.  Care giving wipes out spontaneity, for one thing.  A friend calls and says, “Hey, wanna go down to the bar and watch the game?” and all you can say is “I can’t” or, at best, “Well, I can watch the first quarter but then have to get home.”

Social life withers because the needs of the people in our care keep us pinned down with tasks or plain old being “on watch, just in case.”

When some neighbors invited us to join them around a fire pit on a cool evening, Melissa and I had to take turns. One of us stayed in to watch our son, the other socialized, then we switched. We couldn’t have fun as a couple.

And many folks are uncomfortable coming into a care giving environment, and friends or family who are willing can come only so often without being turned into exhausted, lonely care givers themselves.

Tony Gaines Starz

Tim (right) and his lifetime pal.

We just enjoyed a great weekend.  A childhood friend (of Tim’s) and his wife spent two days here as part of their drive around America.  They didn’t ask much of us – in fact, they were clear that they wanted to see us, not go sightseeing around Sioux Falls.

So we relaxed and shared great memories and ate and laughed and talked about what was on our hearts and minds and… were anything but lonely.  It was wonderful.

Melissa StarzOur son with autism, Joey, was his usual self, staying on the periphery until he was comfortable with the strangers.  You can see the “I’m not sure about this” posture in this picture.  But notice that he’s not detached – he’s looking right into the camera (eye contact is elusive when autism is in the house).  Melissa (middle) is obviously not feeling lonely, stressed or like a caregiver for the moment.  (Note: being a caregiver doesn’t mean you can’t be cute, too.)

The point is that any and all of you who know families in care giving mode – and by that I don’t mean just with autism, but Alzheimer’s, chronic illness, aged parents, disability and just about any situation that can confine one person and others to provide care – have great power to intrude on loneliness and isolation.

YOU are a gift.  Yeah, it’s great when a neighbor clears my driveway in winter.  That saves me some stress and strain.  But even greater is time to laugh and talk and BS about stuff.  All of that human social glue that care giving dries up, you can spill afresh by your time with caregivers and those in our care.

And don’t forget the goatherds.  They get lonely, too.

 

Makin’ a list…

In my energetic youth I spent summers on a church camp staff.

We had a string of international participants who were building up camp director credentials.  One of them was from Switzerland, and his English was a work in progress.  One day I came into the camp office to hear him singing Santa Claus is Coming To Town, which was strange enough in summer time but on top of that he only had three words down and was singing the whole song with those.  C’mon, sing with me now,

Makin’ a list, makin’ a list, makin’ a list, makin’ a list…

Anyway we had company last night, and they’d made a list.  Some local folks who visit this blog messaged us about our son’s upcoming move into a group home.  As caregivers to more than one kid with special needs, this is ground they’ve covered and they reached out to offer help with our upcoming journey.

They’d taken the trouble to sit down and think through issues – some small and practical, others big stuff like money and emotions – and written a list so they wouldn’t forget to open up any of the subjects.

Actually, they had a couple of lists.  One was a record of residents’ share of house expenses so we could start wrapping our heads around the budget.  Stuff like trash pickup:

20170713_081849

The care giving community is rich in hard won wisdom.  It is worthwhile to write notes, keep records, journal, *cough blog cough* and/or just go out for coffee with other caregivers to share info and insight.  We’re all holding some great resources with which to help one another.

While I’m at it, a good spiritual habit is to list moments of grace – those unsought, unplanned moments of God’s favor.  Those unexpected Thank you, God interventions. Reviewing these can lift our spirits when the inevitable hard days show up,

And I said, “This is my fate; the Most High has turned his hand against me.”   But then I recall all you have done, O Lord; I remember your wonderful deeds of long ago.  (Psalm 77:10-11)

Last night’s visit goes on that list of God’s wonderful deeds.  Our guests shared that it was one of those God things that the first post up on their Facebook feed was our last blog about our son’s placement.  We received kind help and good company (and an addictive dessert) through that divine timing.

Allies: we have the Greatest in the heavens and so many He appoints upon the earth.  Too many to list, but how moving it would be to try.