I’m no Mary, he sure ain’t no Jesus…

When Joey was a toddler and we were at camp, the thought flooded my head like perfectly heated steam, while the sun poured into my skin like soft lotion. Some distant, bitter stranger, more like a stick-figure with a disproportionate index finger pointing at me was saying “That is blasphemy, you fool and you will writhe in the pit of Godless Hell.” My conscience made no sense of that brittle, screeching thing.

My thought was that Joey was Jesus and I was Mary. Well, not really. It was more like it felt so perfect, that the love was so pure that it had to be the same love. I thought of my other two children. Did I love them less? I loved them as much, no second thought. Immaculate Conception? Did any reader who barely knows me remain in their chair at that thought? Lastly, Joey had never spoken but one word: “tickle,” and at the time I did not know he would not begin to speak until he was almost five years old. Nothing exceptional about either of us, to the outside world, rather unnoticeable unless misbehaving. 

Misbehaving? I shall not digress much but a doctor has mended a gash in my cornea after one of Joey’s meltdowns. As for me, it took a couple of exceedingly large women walking slowly, diagonally across a mall parking lot, no crosswalk, not looking, got an earful from me and yes, I was sober. To my husband’s chagrin, I was shotgun. 

Back to camp. Joey was 2 years old. He had been diagnosed with severe autism 2 months earlier. Out here in the open, running, clapping or flapping his hands in the fresh-cut grass, he had very few sensory issues. An “older” mother, I was 41.

Now I am almost 62, Joey is 24 and I am thinking perhaps God needed me to love him as deeply as Mary loved Jesus to get through the years of violence and injury he brought, mostly to me because I was physically the weakest, emotionally the most vulnerable, and although autistic, he was smart-enough to know it.

And if that was not enough there were the “outsiders:” every  wise-ass parent who saw a neuro-typical looking child like mine behaving badly and concluded it was my bad parenting, or the parent of another autistic child who had all the answers… I should not have immunized him as I did my other 2, I should have spent tens of thousands of dollars for some amazing camp run by people who looked like the people who used to hang at Haight-Ashbury which would “cure” him. Lastly, the 6-figure paid government employees who knew nothing about education but decided what kind of help my son and other children like him would not receive. Those meetings were tortuous hours.

I still feel the overpowering love that I can only guess Mary felt for Jesus, who was helpless to the world. Of course it is completely different. Of course it is not.


I’m a little teapot…

Melissa and I just bought  this whistling teapot:


Her social media comment says it all.

The autistic kid moves, the tea kettle whistles after 22 years

We’ve chronicled some of the sensory issues that bedeviled Joey and through him the whole family.  We had to banish whistling teapots from our home for 22 years because the sound distressed him to the point of meltdown.

Hey, it wasn’t all bad.  I mean, I had plenty of opportunities to avoid cleaning the house because the sound of a vacuum put him over the edge.

But the little blue teapot is another sign of our lives being liberated from the concessions, adaptations and drudgeries of care giving.

Hang in there, wherever you are on the care giving journey.  I’ve been slogging through the Biblical Prophet Ezekiel.  The first 39 chapters are a gloomy tale of people living in exile, familiar life erased.

Then one day life starts to come back together.

The Games of the XXIV Joelympiad

Greetings from the evening of Joey’s 24th birthday.

20180225_184237The gang at his new group home made a card and all the residents and staff signed.  They were all very smiley as they shared it with me when I picked Joey up to have dinner, gifts and an evening with mom and dad.

One of the staff also baked a cake which Joey devoured for lunch before we drove off.  OK, I had a piece, too.  Seemed the courteous thing to do, and you know that caregivers are all about modeling good social skills.

We took Joe out to a favorite place for the evening meal.


Back here at the house, mom offered him a couple of requested videos, but ONLY after he read “Happy 24th Birthday Joey” off the gift bag.




Here he is inspecting the gifts.






And here he is after much exhortation to let me get a pic.  Smile not included.




Not sure he’s watched either movie just yet.  He’s pacing around the house processing things, although he just said, “Coming soon to a theater near you.”

We went so far as to unlock the cabinet in which sits his VCR.  We are so happy with his progress in this new year of life that we’re willing to let him go back to pushing rewind over and over and over and over and over and…

Well, for one night.  It’s his birthday, after all.

Cue the Music

One of our autistic son’s pleasures is music.

He’s done well in music therapy, even showing some potential on drums.

He’s eclectic in his tastes.  He likes Disney movies for their music; he enjoys soundtracks by Rodgers and Hammerstein; and now and then he gets hooked on a popular song and tracks it down on YouTube to play over and over.

Now that he’s in his own residence, reminders of his likes and quirks sneak up on me as pleasures rather than form a constant din.  That happened quickly.  We’ve been less than a month with him living elsewhere.

This frosty morning, too early, I hopped in the car to go to work and punched on the car radio.  This was playing:

I don’t know why our son took a liking to this song years ago, but it’s one he circles around to every few months.

I started laughing and got a bit misty eyed on the short drive to work.  The song had me thinking fond thoughts and offering little prayers for our son.

We have him over once a week.  It’s not a long distance relationship.  But tender thoughts move in quickly to drive out the anxious energy that care giving required and sustained over decades.

I’m liking this aspect of the change.


Miss me yet?

Nah, if your life is like mine, you’re up to your posterior in reptiles.  Who cares if some dork blogs about stuff when you have more stuff than you can handle?

About a month ago I wrote happily about our son’s move into a group home.  Reports from the staff continue to be positive.  Heck, last weekend Joey was selectively communicative but smiley just the same when we asked him about the group’s trip to see Disney on Ice. (Random thought: with temperatures dropping here I could probably show a Disney movie in my backyard and call it Disney on Ice.  But I digress).

For now, we have him stay at the new place Friday night through Monday morning.  He spends the “work week” here with us.

So, what’s this like, this zone between empty nest and care giving?  It’s a bit of both.  No, a lot of both.  A word that my wife taught me comes to mind: Transition.  Of course I knew that word in some contexts, but she taught me about it as applied to childbirth, 

This is the hardest phase but also the shortest

Well, let’s hope it’s short.  I mean, the last “phase” was 23 years so this should be a flash in comparison.

Here are some stray things I’m observing and processing.  Hope they might be helpful to you if you are thinking about or in the midst of this kind of transition:

  • Yes, some chores go away.  But others pop up.  He’s technically a tenant now, so I’m writing his rent, utility and activity checks.  So all of a sudden I get extra of one of my favorite tasks, bill paying.  Yep, there’s a flurry of new paperwork in my life.
  • The peace and quiet and laid back pace when he’s not here are wonderful.  All that stuff you hoped/are hoping for?  Yep.  No middle of the night interruptions.  No bathroom accidents.  No holes drilled in your head by verbal perseveration about this and that.  No structuring your day around care giving routines. Coffee tastes better, hot strangers ask you out on dates, the moon is in the seventh house…  OK, I’m exaggerating.  But this big change is a real and overdue blessing.
  • Life continues to dole out rations of crud.  All the other stuff that you were ignoring comes into focus.  Our years-past-the-average-lifespan-of-her-breed dog is having various symptoms of her advanced age.  And so we have the discussion of spending lots of bucks to keep her going or to play the bad guy and have her put down.  Yes, the new freedom is nice.  But life continues to do its thing in your face.
  • Emotions bounce around.  And I mean for all of us.  The other day Joey kept bringing up “donuts and pizza,” a sweet dad and son routine we’ve been having on Saturdays for years.  He misses it.  When he vocalized it, it went right to my heart and it frigging tugged.  No, not tugged.  Applied a wrestling finishing move.  Mom reads the emotions in Joey’s eyes.  She can see he’s struggling with the change – not that he can’t handle the routines and activities of the new place, but that he’s homesick for our place.  So is the lesson that providing a loving home will come back to break your heart?  (Man, sorry, now I sound like sappy pop “Christmas” muzak.  But I digress, again.)
  • Challenging discussions come up.  Should our response to his objections be to immerse him into the group home more aggressively or to prolong his weekended status until he stops lamenting?
  • Holidays are a mixed bag.  The house is filled with familiar decorations and activities that Joey loves.  Having him home much of the week is, we hope, reassurance that life as he knows it isn’t over.  We’re still including him in fun with people he knows and adores (and who reciprocate that affection!)  But the emotional upheaval of a big transition in these tender times adds pangs of pain.  (Dang, this does sound like childbirth).

In other news, Joey brought home some seasonal arts and crafts pieces from his day program, among them this little wreath ornament:


It’s the only ornament on our tree right now.  We are having a bunch of friends over on an upcoming night to have pizza and other good stuff with Joey and to help us finish decorating the tree.

The green holds the hope of spring against the winter gloom. Transition is the short, painful phase that gives way to the birth of a new life.

Hope to share more soon.  Meanwhile, my prayer is that you find blessing in all of your transitions.

Empty Nest Weekend #1

Our son with autism spent his first weekend in his new group home.

It was a flurry of activity for mom and dad; writing rent and utility checks, buying furniture (hint – if you have a used hotel furniture place in town, you can save a ton), hanging curtains, buying extra clothes and toiletries…

Joey bed frame LOL

This sign on the bed frame box made me laugh.  It is the mockery of all of our precise planning.  You just KNOW it can’t be true.

Still, the reports back from the staff were more than encouraging.

Joey slept well in the new room.  That’s big.  One reason we’ve been unable to travel much with him is that he can’t sleep in strange places.  He gets up and wanders all night, then inflicts all of the consequences of sleep deprivation on us the next day.

Joey room Thurman

It helped that he’d been to this place on a past respite weekend and that we brought in some familiar furnishings from our house, such as his own blankets, the desk for his laptop, his rolling office chair and the cross you can spot in the middle of this picture –>



Joey chose to socialize rather than isolate.  Even with his computer and a VCR available in his room, he hung out in common areas with the other guys.  That news did our hearts good.  He’s going to have a community there.  He’s not feeling lost.

Of course we spent our first night as empty nesters fretting and pacing and crying.

Nah, actually, we went out for sushi.  And a Sake Bomb.  Proud to say I downed mine faster than a young husband and wife competing with me down the bar.

Caregiving.  It makes you hardcore.

Joey post move Sake Bomb


The Hamper of Love

Our son’s move to a group home is becoming like a wedding, with the exception that our family has someone moving out instead of in.

Like a wedding, the big plans all looked great on paper, but as the day draws near the details multiply like pick-your-favorite-thing-that-overpopulates.

Today was shopping for toiletries and some extra clothes for him to have at the new place.

20171104_160224Here’s the pile at midday.  I was proud of finding some sales and bargains.  I also rented a truck (no, it’s not in the laundry basket) to move furniture next week.

This morning was sweet.  His older brother and his wife were in town en route to a real wedding, and we all went out to breakfast.  Joey sat between them and smiled a lot.  Melissa remarked on how adult he’s become about social settings.  He doesn’t have to sit bookended by mom and dad.  He uses his fork and spoon like a pro (still don’t trust him with knives).  He interacts, in his own way, with those around him – when his orange juice arrived he wanted to use a straw, so he handed one to his sister in law to unwrap for him.  Yeah, he’s never gonna be cool with fine motor skills.

The weird thing is that as his moving day approaches, he’s increasingly fun to be with.  Is that just because we know the day is at hand and we’re relaxing?  Or, does HE know and is he angling for a sympathy extension at our place?

Flashing before my eyes

Not my life, but my son’s life.  That’s what flashing before my eyes.

Today we have the meeting to set up his move to a group home.  All of the staff will be there, both the folks from his day program and from the house where he will live.

It’s a positive thing, of course, something for which we’ve (my wife and I) waited for a long time.

I can’t speak for her feelings, and I can only guess at our son’s, so I’ll shift to first person here.

I realize that my role in my son’s life is not over, but much of what I can do and shape is.  I’ve formed what I can in his life, second guessed myself to the point of agony, been critiqued and judged plenty from without, as well as encouraged and supported at precious points along the way.

I can look back on…


JOEY Yucaipa


…who Joey was…



Daves mom and joe



…who he’s become…







…and ponder who he’ll be.





Something of me travels with him, of course.  And I pray that it is whatever is true, whatever is honourable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is pleasing, whatever is commendable (Philippians 4:8).  God knows and every day reminds me that there’s plenty of me that needs to be ignored and forgotten, and I can only pray that little of that drags along with Joey.

So a new leg of the journey commences, over territory we’ve not been and over which we’ll have ever diminishing control.  But ain’t that life.

An old priest I knew always included a warning in his message at the baptism of a child.  You (parents) know that you’re handing your child over to God now.  You’re no longer in charge of the outcomes.

As my life flashes before my eyes, and Joey’s plays across my imagination, I’ll trust that warning, and know that all of our lives are in the hands of the One who’s cared for us beyond all deserving.

 They will declare,  “The Lord is just!  He is my rock!  There is no evil in him!”  (Psalm 92:15, NLT)

You open your email and…

On behalf of the Placement Committee, I would like to offer a tour at [a special needs group home] to Joey Fountain.

I like to write but all of the descriptions of my reaction to this message get trite. You know, my jaw hit the floor, my eyes popped out of my head kind of stuff.

Joey, our son with autism, is 23 now.  We’ve hoped for and dreaded this opportunity for years.  I can’t blog a whole lot on it at the moment because our thoughts and emotions are bouncing off the walls (man, this is getting cheesier by the keyboard stroke).

[Let me throw in one practical suggestion.  If you are a Google user, Google Docs is a great resource.  My wife started a document with our growing list of questions and stuff to get done as we approach the transition meetings and the move itself.  It auto-saves, so you can’t lose stuff by closing it in an emotional haze.  You can use email to invite in others (you know, your spouse and other care giving ally types), so they can open it on their screen and add to it as well.

If you are awake all night stewing about the issue (as are we), you can just add to the document and your allies will be able to see it when they open the document later.  No need to make copies and then more copies as you revise – you can all be online editing together in real time.]

In Raising a Child with Autism, I shared a lovely little vignette about Melissa raising gardenias and then wrote,

Giving away gardenias hardly compares to the “giveaway” in our future.  Joey is on a waiting list to move into a group residence.  It is uncomfortable to think about looking into his bedroom, just down the hall from ours, and seeing an empty space.  Like Melissa’s gardenias, he’s grown in beautiful ways.  And the time is coming to let him go.

That was composed in reflective calm, when the “waiting list” was just a vague background reality, something that wouldn’t really mean anything until…  until a couple of weeks ago when I opened my email and there it was, specific, real and hulking in the foreground of our lives.

I’m sure Melissa and I will share more here as we walk through this together.  Your prayers and encouragement mean a great deal.

For now, here’s a sweet picture of Joey, taken one 4th of July in Sioux Falls.  We know holidays can be a challenge for caregivers – here’s hoping that your family “fireworks” stay far off in the sky.

Smiling Joey