About caregivingstinks

We hope to mix hope, tenderness and an occasional laugh with tales of frustration, hard work and bodily waste.

Sink your teeth into this

A dental hygienist and care giver to a son with autism did a bit of field research on what could help make a visit to the dentist a success for the child and family.

She found five factors, with communication central to the whole effort.  She visualized it this way:

Autism dental

From the linked article.

Note the importance of Parent carer confidence.  There’s the saying that you should be your own advocate when it comes to your medical care.  Caregivers have to advocate for those who rely on our help.  In the case of dental visits, the author of the study found that

Parents expressed a lack of confidence in approaching the dentist when issues arose. They often assumed that the dentist’s education had provided enough training to understand and support individuals who struggled attending dental examinations. For those parents confident enough to ask for minor changes to meet their child’s individual needs, they reported that these requests were often met with reluctance. Therefore, despite their best efforts, dental visits were largely unsuccessful.
Dental teams that took time to respond flexibly to parental requests for support had more positive experiences. Check-ups were also positive when the whole dental team became involved in the care of the child. This was demonstrated by one dental team who discovered a boy’s love for washing machines. There was a washing machine at the practice so the receptionists would take him to see it if the dentist was running late, or after his check-up.
Helpful strategies included providing information on what to expect before a check-up and making thorough notes so parents did not have to repeat themselves at every appointment. This continuity before and after a check-up was really valued by participating families.
When we express the likes, dislikes and needs of those in our care, we find that we can make allies.  Sure, there are people and places that lack flexibility.  It’s up to us to seek out and open up the practices that are supportive.


I’m no Mary, he sure ain’t no Jesus…

When Joey was a toddler and we were at camp, the thought flooded my head like perfectly heated steam, while the sun poured into my skin like soft lotion. Some distant, bitter stranger, more like a stick-figure with a disproportionate index finger pointing at me was saying “That is blasphemy, you fool and you will writhe in the pit of Godless Hell.” My conscience made no sense of that brittle, screeching thing.

My thought was that Joey was Jesus and I was Mary. Well, not really. It was more like it felt so perfect, that the love was so pure that it had to be the same love. I thought of my other two children. Did I love them less? I loved them as much, no second thought. Immaculate Conception? Did any reader who barely knows me remain in their chair at that thought? Lastly, Joey had never spoken but one word: “tickle,” and at the time I did not know he would not begin to speak until he was almost five years old. Nothing exceptional about either of us, to the outside world, rather unnoticeable unless misbehaving. 

Misbehaving? I shall not digress much but a doctor has mended a gash in my cornea after one of Joey’s meltdowns. As for me, it took a couple of exceedingly large women walking slowly, diagonally across a mall parking lot, no crosswalk, not looking, got an earful from me and yes, I was sober. To my husband’s chagrin, I was shotgun. 

Back to camp. Joey was 2 years old. He had been diagnosed with severe autism 2 months earlier. Out here in the open, running, clapping or flapping his hands in the fresh-cut grass, he had very few sensory issues. An “older” mother, I was 41.

Now I am almost 62, Joey is 24 and I am thinking perhaps God needed me to love him as deeply as Mary loved Jesus to get through the years of violence and injury he brought, mostly to me because I was physically the weakest, emotionally the most vulnerable, and although autistic, he was smart-enough to know it.

And if that was not enough there were the “outsiders:” every  wise-ass parent who saw a neuro-typical looking child like mine behaving badly and concluded it was my bad parenting, or the parent of another autistic child who had all the answers… I should not have immunized him as I did my other 2, I should have spent tens of thousands of dollars for some amazing camp run by people who looked like the people who used to hang at Haight-Ashbury which would “cure” him. Lastly, the 6-figure paid government employees who knew nothing about education but decided what kind of help my son and other children like him would not receive. Those meetings were tortuous hours.

I still feel the overpowering love that I can only guess Mary felt for Jesus, who was helpless to the world. Of course it is completely different. Of course it is not.


I’m a little teapot…

Melissa and I just bought  this whistling teapot:


Her social media comment says it all.

The autistic kid moves, the tea kettle whistles after 22 years

We’ve chronicled some of the sensory issues that bedeviled Joey and through him the whole family.  We had to banish whistling teapots from our home for 22 years because the sound distressed him to the point of meltdown.

Hey, it wasn’t all bad.  I mean, I had plenty of opportunities to avoid cleaning the house because the sound of a vacuum put him over the edge.

But the little blue teapot is another sign of our lives being liberated from the concessions, adaptations and drudgeries of care giving.

Hang in there, wherever you are on the care giving journey.  I’ve been slogging through the Biblical Prophet Ezekiel.  The first 39 chapters are a gloomy tale of people living in exile, familiar life erased.

Then one day life starts to come back together.

Silver Roses

An excerpt from our book showed up on our Publisher’s page today.  Hope it helps you get off of your own back.

One year, my wife and I planted roses all around our backyard. If we knew what we were doing, we would tell you that the flowers were called Lady Wilhelmina Sunburst Spectaculars or some such name. The reality is we went to the nursery and said things like, “Oh, let’s get some of those silver ones.”

Sure, we had red roses and yellow roses, but we were really excited by the bush that would give us silver roses. Our friends would stare and sputter, “Wow, silver roses. Never seen those.”

We planted the silver rose bush in a prominent angle of our fence line. It would be the eye-catching star of the backyard. We followed the nursery’s instructions about how deep to dig, how much to water, and whether it liked red or white wine with meals.

Our dog at the time was a burly malamute mix named Rocky. Evidently, he shared our interest in silver roses. We came home one afternoon to find Rocky lying on the grass, gnawing on the dug-up silver rose bush. After much arm-flapping and loud shouts of, “Oh no!” and “Bad dog!” we replanted the bush. Rocky was a good dog and left it alone. A few weeks later, we had our silver roses. That rose bush didn’t pout because a couple of beginning gardeners forgot to protect it from their dog. It just went back to making silver roses.

Our son Joey endured much because his caregivers were medical amateurs. We never spotted warning signs before a seizure caused him to bang his head on a TV stand, making him bleed profusely. He couldn’t tell us that a stomach bug had him dehydrated, and all we could do was watch the emergency room nurses give him an IV to re-inflate him like a tire.

But after incidents like those, he just took up wherever he left off. Our expertise—or lack thereof—didn’t bother him. He went back to his daily routines and loved us just the same. Joey is not what we made him or failed to make him. He’s always carried strengths of his own that we can admire as precious gifts from God.

We are part of a culture that takes responsibility for too much and assumes that our every word, deed, or thought will have a life-altering impact. Caregivers take that warped thinking to another level since we are in constant interaction with people who have special needs, and we assume that we will do them more harm by our perceived failures.

“For we are to God the pleasing aroma of Christ among those who are being saved and those who are perishing. To the one we are an aroma that brings death; to the other, an aroma that brings life. And who is equal to such a task?” (2 Corinthians 2:15-16 NIV).

We are who we are. Others are who they are, too. Our impact on them is dictated as much by their own inner workings as by our intention and skill.

So let’s drop fear of failure from the one hand and fantasy futures from the other and concentrate on taking hold of what is true in the relationships entrusted to us by God in the here and now. Those placed in our care have special needs we can meet, but they are unique people and not just extensions of our lives.

Silver roses are not our creations; they are the beautiful flowers of tough plants.

The Games of the XXIV Joelympiad

Greetings from the evening of Joey’s 24th birthday.

20180225_184237The gang at his new group home made a card and all the residents and staff signed.  They were all very smiley as they shared it with me when I picked Joey up to have dinner, gifts and an evening with mom and dad.

One of the staff also baked a cake which Joey devoured for lunch before we drove off.  OK, I had a piece, too.  Seemed the courteous thing to do, and you know that caregivers are all about modeling good social skills.

We took Joe out to a favorite place for the evening meal.


Back here at the house, mom offered him a couple of requested videos, but ONLY after he read “Happy 24th Birthday Joey” off the gift bag.




Here he is inspecting the gifts.






And here he is after much exhortation to let me get a pic.  Smile not included.




Not sure he’s watched either movie just yet.  He’s pacing around the house processing things, although he just said, “Coming soon to a theater near you.”

We went so far as to unlock the cabinet in which sits his VCR.  We are so happy with his progress in this new year of life that we’re willing to let him go back to pushing rewind over and over and over and over and over and…

Well, for one night.  It’s his birthday, after all.

Waiting for the other one to drop.

I went over to our son’s group home to pick him up for an overnight here.  Nice evening, got his hair cut, had lots of pizza with friends, the good things in life.

But the big news is what happened when I picked him up.  A staff person at the house said, “Joey, your dad’s here.  Get ready to go.”

Lo and behold, Joey went into his room and came out a moment later HAVING PUT ON HIS OWN SHOES.


Yeah, those black ones on the top of the pile!  They were on his feet!  All by themselves or something!

That’s something we weren’t able to get him to do for 23 years, and in just a few weeks of living with a bit of independence (and housemates who won’t be manipulated into doing it all for him) he can “shoe” himself.

And that’s not all.  He’s using pronouns and grammar more appropriately.

Most of all, he’s smiling a whole lot on these visits.  He’s not disoriented by changes in routine like he used to be.

Next week’s his 24th birthday.  Looking forward to having him over for a celebration.

Death and that other stuff

So yesterday I did my taxes.  Well, I compiled all the stuff so a tax pro could do tax pro voodoo with it.

Screenshot 2018-02-09 03.54.10

Screen grab from my personal Facebook page.

Tax time gives me mixed feelings.

Yes, it’s a pain with our over-complicated system, built for those with the means to manipulate and a money vacuum stuck in the pockets of working people.  So I grumble.

But because all kinds of people all over the place pay taxes, there are various programs that make life gentler for our son with autism, and that ease our burdens as caregivers.  So I give thanks.

But more than all of this is the fact that I had to download and print a number of documents.  THIS is where I felt the impact of decades as a caregiver.

See, our son likes to grab pieces of paper, crumble them up and wave them in moments of self-stimulation.  As a result we used to keep all of our bills and documents secure, and we never, ever, ever left paper in the exposed printer feed tray.

So yesterday, after printing the 1095 and the mortgage interest thingy and such, I took all the paper out of the feed tray and hid it in a file cabinet.  Even though our son doesn’t live here anymore.  

Care giving.  A gift that keeps giving.  With all the certainty of death and… and… what was I talking about?

Cue the Music

One of our autistic son’s pleasures is music.

He’s done well in music therapy, even showing some potential on drums.

He’s eclectic in his tastes.  He likes Disney movies for their music; he enjoys soundtracks by Rodgers and Hammerstein; and now and then he gets hooked on a popular song and tracks it down on YouTube to play over and over.

Now that he’s in his own residence, reminders of his likes and quirks sneak up on me as pleasures rather than form a constant din.  That happened quickly.  We’ve been less than a month with him living elsewhere.

This frosty morning, too early, I hopped in the car to go to work and punched on the car radio.  This was playing:

I don’t know why our son took a liking to this song years ago, but it’s one he circles around to every few months.

I started laughing and got a bit misty eyed on the short drive to work.  The song had me thinking fond thoughts and offering little prayers for our son.

We have him over once a week.  It’s not a long distance relationship.  But tender thoughts move in quickly to drive out the anxious energy that care giving required and sustained over decades.

I’m liking this aspect of the change.

One week at HIS house

Our son just accomplished his first week in a staffed group home.

He’s here at home our place (yes, we’re trying to call the new house HIS home) to spend the night.  This afternoon and evening will include a haircut by his fave stylist and a pizza party with her family.

The week was a case of “no news is good news” since not hearing from the staff meant no problems.

20171208_135432When I went to pick him up at HIS HOUSE (I must keep practicing this) he was comfortable in HIS greenish recliner ($50 at a used hotel furniture place).  I simply told him that we were going to mom-and-dad’s house for a haircut and pizza with his stylist and her kids.

He came along just fine – although he was a bit confused by my car sitting in HIS driveway.  He turned toward the garage to look for the house van.  He’s already into all of the routines of HIS NEW HOUSE.

Once at our place, he got in a hug from mom.  He was a bit miffed that the Christmas tree is down, but that didn’t last long.

Now he’s taking a short nap in his old bed (with a cushy new blanket he got for Christmas.  Friends provided a second cushy new blanket for HIS house and it even goes with HIS drapes.

This is going well.

Of course there’s the trite line from the old Westerns, It’s quiet.  TOO quiet.

Man Card played; Man Card lost

Tonight I have to surrender my Man Card.  I’m crying on and off.

Yes, it’s anticipation of our younger son moving into the special needs group home tomorrow and not being around here.

Yes, it’s relief after a couple of decades of care giving.

Yes, it’s just all kinds of pent up, ignored, overdue and otherwise not well processed feelings.

Started the day in a manly way.  My older son and I went to the local gun shop and looked at manly guns.

We went on the manly range and I rented a reasonably manly piece and shot some almost manly groupings on my targets.

We went to a manly brasserie and had manly fare including manly beer (fourth one from the top scrolling down).

Now I’m sitting around crying on and off.

I leave this here and sign off: