About caregivingstinks

We hope to mix hope, tenderness and an occasional laugh with tales of frustration, hard work and bodily waste.

Empty Nest Weekend #1

Our son with autism spent his first weekend in his new group home.

It was a flurry of activity for mom and dad; writing rent and utility checks, buying furniture (hint – if you have a used hotel furniture place in town, you can save a ton), hanging curtains, buying extra clothes and toiletries…

Joey bed frame LOL

This sign on the bed frame box made me laugh.  It is the mockery of all of our precise planning.  You just KNOW it can’t be true.

Still, the reports back from the staff were more than encouraging.

Joey slept well in the new room.  That’s big.  One reason we’ve been unable to travel much with him is that he can’t sleep in strange places.  He gets up and wanders all night, then inflicts all of the consequences of sleep deprivation on us the next day.

Joey room Thurman

It helped that he’d been to this place on a past respite weekend and that we brought in some familiar furnishings from our house, such as his own blankets, the desk for his laptop, his rolling office chair and the cross you can spot in the middle of this picture –>

 

 

Joey chose to socialize rather than isolate.  Even with his computer and a VCR available in his room, he hung out in common areas with the other guys.  That news did our hearts good.  He’s going to have a community there.  He’s not feeling lost.

Of course we spent our first night as empty nesters fretting and pacing and crying.

Nah, actually, we went out for sushi.  And a Sake Bomb.  Proud to say I downed mine faster than a young husband and wife competing with me down the bar.

Caregiving.  It makes you hardcore.

Joey post move Sake Bomb

 

The Hamper of Love

Our son’s move to a group home is becoming like a wedding, with the exception that our family has someone moving out instead of in.

Like a wedding, the big plans all looked great on paper, but as the day draws near the details multiply like pick-your-favorite-thing-that-overpopulates.

Today was shopping for toiletries and some extra clothes for him to have at the new place.

20171104_160224Here’s the pile at midday.  I was proud of finding some sales and bargains.  I also rented a truck (no, it’s not in the laundry basket) to move furniture next week.

This morning was sweet.  His older brother and his wife were in town en route to a real wedding, and we all went out to breakfast.  Joey sat between them and smiled a lot.  Melissa remarked on how adult he’s become about social settings.  He doesn’t have to sit bookended by mom and dad.  He uses his fork and spoon like a pro (still don’t trust him with knives).  He interacts, in his own way, with those around him – when his orange juice arrived he wanted to use a straw, so he handed one to his sister in law to unwrap for him.  Yeah, he’s never gonna be cool with fine motor skills.

The weird thing is that as his moving day approaches, he’s increasingly fun to be with.  Is that just because we know the day is at hand and we’re relaxing?  Or, does HE know and is he angling for a sympathy extension at our place?

No trick! This is a treat…

Governor Dennis Daugaard of South Dakota officially proclaimed November as Family Caregivers Month!  Give his official Proclamation a read – that’s you lurking somewhere in the statistics and words of praise.  1

No, you’re not crazy.

Well, maybe you are.  But since care giving puts a whuppin’ on body, heart and mind over time there’s no surprise that our lives reflect the damage.

I’m currently reading Being Mortal but Atul Gawande.  The author is a surgeon who also writes outstanding prose that invites the lay person to look at medical issues and medical professionals to look at the human impact of their work.

Yesterday, I read his description of an adult daughter caring for her father,

Taking care of a debilitated, elderly person in our medicalized era is an overwhelming combination of the technological and the custodial… The burdens for today’s caregiver have actually increased from what they would have been a century ago.  Shelley had become a round-the-clock concierge/chauffeur/schedule manager/medication-and-technology troubleshooter, in addition to cook/maid/attendant, not to mention income earner.  Last minute cancellations by health aides and changes in medical appointments played havoc with her performance at work, and everything played havoc with her emotions at home… 

She felt her sanity slipping.

Misery (or is it madness?) loves company, and I was reminded of what I wrote in the intro to Raising A Child With Autism,

Maybe you are an amateur trying to be caregiver, therapist, clinician, advocate, mommy, daddy and everything else to a loved one living with autism. You feel like a lone idiot with a leaky hose when the job needs a landscape company.

So if you’re out there feeling depressed, or enraged, or exhausted, or or or or… just repeat after Dr. Sheldon Cooper:

sheldon not crazy

Flashing before my eyes

Not my life, but my son’s life.  That’s what flashing before my eyes.

Today we have the meeting to set up his move to a group home.  All of the staff will be there, both the folks from his day program and from the house where he will live.

It’s a positive thing, of course, something for which we’ve (my wife and I) waited for a long time.

I can’t speak for her feelings, and I can only guess at our son’s, so I’ll shift to first person here.

I realize that my role in my son’s life is not over, but much of what I can do and shape is.  I’ve formed what I can in his life, second guessed myself to the point of agony, been critiqued and judged plenty from without, as well as encouraged and supported at precious points along the way.

I can look back on…

 

JOEY Yucaipa

 

…who Joey was…

 

 

Daves mom and joe

 

 

…who he’s become…

 

 

 

20170723_110957

 

 

…and ponder who he’ll be.

 

 

 

 

Something of me travels with him, of course.  And I pray that it is whatever is true, whatever is honourable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is pleasing, whatever is commendable (Philippians 4:8).  God knows and every day reminds me that there’s plenty of me that needs to be ignored and forgotten, and I can only pray that little of that drags along with Joey.

So a new leg of the journey commences, over territory we’ve not been and over which we’ll have ever diminishing control.  But ain’t that life.

An old priest I knew always included a warning in his message at the baptism of a child.  You (parents) know that you’re handing your child over to God now.  You’re no longer in charge of the outcomes.

As my life flashes before my eyes, and Joey’s plays across my imagination, I’ll trust that warning, and know that all of our lives are in the hands of the One who’s cared for us beyond all deserving.

 They will declare,  “The Lord is just!  He is my rock!  There is no evil in him!”  (Psalm 92:15, NLT)

Let Me Hold Your hand Through Life My Son (Autism and other things too) by Zanele Dlamini 

The mother of an adult son with autism processes her thoughts and emotions by composing a letter to him.

David Snape and Friends - The place to show off your hidden talents

A mother’s promise to her autistic boy on his eighteenth birthday..

If I could turn back time, my baby boy, I would rub out Autism from your life.I would be flying around doing superhero things that would give you a better start in life. Give you all the tools to survive this world on your own.Now that you are an adult. There is so much that I wish you knew. So much I wish I could tell you about people and relationships. There is so much you need to know about love (girls too), pain, abandonment and loneliness. If only you could understand.

My son, I want you know that I cried today when you were diagnosed with yet another mental health problem. It is like you are in a fighting ring and the punches keep coming from all sides. I had to allow doctors to inject you for the…

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It’s on

Here’s the latest on our 23 year old son with autism’s transition to a group residence:

Yes, we have a pre-move team meeting next week and a move in date of November 1, per this message from the Case Manager,

Hello Team,

Joey and I would like to invite you to his ISP Pre-move meeting.

Date: Friday, September 22nd, 2017
Time: 3:30pm
Location: XXXXX Conference Room 3

The purpose of this meeting is to discuss supports Joey will need during his transition to the XXXXX house.

Melissa (mom) is working with Joey on feeling more comfortable with his new computer, which will move with him. He hates change so this was a heck of a time for his old desktop to go kaput.

His most recent antic was to unplug the new laptop, take it off the desk and plop it by its purchase box to say, “Send it back.”

Melissa coached him on being more at home with it, and they had a good discussion one recent morning before his bus arrived and a good hands on lesson last night.

I’m off today and we are planning to go to a sports bar that Joey likes because it is roomy and has great burgers.

Which gave Melissa leverage when he didn’t want his computer lesson. All she had to say was “Working for cheeseburgers.” He complied.

It’s on. The computer is on. The move is on.

Meanwhile the dog did some neurotic paw gnawing last night, opened a wound, and thus cancelled her scheduled bath and grooming.

That’s care giving. Deal with one issue, and the next one comes up from somewhere, somehow.

Seasons change

Joey Tree picOur son brought home this autumn tree art from his day program.  We put it up to catch some natural light.

It is timely, as next month (still, for the moment, unless there’s another change, hopefully) is his move into a group home setting and our overdue commencement of empty nesting.

Changing seasons, each with their own simultaneous losses and beauties.  And mysteries for later revelation.

For everything there is a season, and a time for every matter under heaven: 
a time to be born, and a time to die;
a time to plant, and a time to pluck up what is planted; 
a time to kill, and a time to heal;
a time to break down, and a time to build up; 
a time to weep, and a time to laugh;
a time to mourn, and a time to dance; 
a time to throw away stones, and a time to gather stones together;
a time to embrace, and a time to refrain from embracing; 
a time to seek, and a time to lose;
a time to keep, and a time to throw away; 
a time to tear, and a time to sew;
a time to keep silence, and a time to speak; 
a time to love, and a time to hate;
a time for war, and a time for peace.

Ecclesiastes 3:1-8

 

Don’t Call Us

Our publisher’s site features a bit from our book today.

If you are grappling with frustration, especially if it’s born of perfectionism and the constant setbacks of care giving, you might find this little selection useful.

pathetic-7If our efforts to raise houseplants have been hit and miss, imagine some of the misadventures of raising a son with autism. Caregiving provides instant and constant experiences of inadequacy. Just as we’ve tried various strategies to keep the plants growing, we’ve sought out an array of therapies, settings, medications, specialists, diets and more to bring out the best in Joey’s life. And even with all that help, there are plenty of withered efforts to report.

It’s not all gloom and doom.  Some of the spiritual uplift (we hope) of the book comes in as well.

Hoping you have some good growth and blooming amid all your fails and weeds today.

The care giving must go on

A new care giving blog opens up about those days when it seems like the whole world – even the DOG, for cryin’ out loud – seems to need your care. But then the news intrudes with some perspective.

Care Giver Life

So a couple of posts ago I wrote about my dog getting older, he is now 14 years old. I had to buy some doggie diapers for him , well as an update the doggie diapers are working so well that I just bought more. I found the best price at Amazon.

So now as I’ve said before I just take care of everyone. This week so far has been very hectic as my new assignment with Hoover(my dog) moves on and of course my mom has been a bit demanding this week(her arthritis has been really bothering her, and her hands are just terrible. I put warm compresses on her hands, it helps a little bit. My stove broke and i’ve already put to much into keeping it working so I picked up and (what i call) an old new stove. its from the 1950’s i think but it…

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