Be a voice while waiting for a voice

APRIL IS AUTISM AWARENESS MONTH

A mother with considerable language skill shares about coming to terms with her daughter’s autism:  

As a speaker of English, Italian, French and Russian, the fact that my daughter did not have speech was a constant source of despair…Yes, I still find myself hoping that one day my daughter will speak to me and tell me all about what it’s like be autistic, but for now, I can wait.

The mom makes use of her local newspaper to share insight into autism and the needs of family caregivers.  Being a voice for those in our care and for caregivers can spread not only awareness but opportunities for support and compassion:

Without a support group, I had no guidance on how to deal with issues created by my daughter’s condition in public, so I did the best I could to be honest and take responsibility.

When a stranger would scold my daughter or shout at her for behaving inappropriately in public, I would say, “I’m sorry. My daughter has autism. We meant no offense.”

I didn’t know how people would react, and I was surprised by the response I got. Often the person would say, “I’m sorry. I didn’t know.”

But sometimes they would say, “I have three grandchildren with autism,” or “My niece and nephew have autism,”or “My best friend’s son has severe ADHA and is on the spectrum.”

On at least one occasion, a complete stranger came up to me afterwards,, and told me about a member of their family with a disability.

There are a lot of us out there, and if you follow the news on autism, there are more of us every day.

Often we would take a few minutes to talk about the difficulties involved with rearing a child with a disability and the stress, not just about behavior, but also of not knowing where they will be developmentally in 10 years, or 20 years, or after you’re gone.

I learned that I wasn’t alone.

Recently, a group of us in Yankton formed our own “Mothers of Disabled Children” support group. It’s small, and we’ve only met a couple of times, but I already look forward to hearing about what’s going on with the other moms and their kids — without judgement.

It is a great example of communication with the community, both in the happenstance encounters she describes and in the intentional formation of groups and use of local information sources.

 

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