Prime time

Amazon Prime Days are at hand, running from the afternoon of Monday, July 16th thru Tuesday the 17th.

Book Cover

If you’re shopping at Amazon consider snagging our book, which distills our care giving experience and hopefully offers an encouraging word or two for those in the stinky trenches.

Besides, the kid broke another VCR and… well, heck no, I’m probably NOT buying another such hard to get and pricey item for him.   But maybe you can send us out to a nice dinner and drinks to assuage our frustrations.

Hope you’ll consider checking out the book – for you or a care giving family you know.

Not available for VCR, but there’s a free download for Kindle Unlimited.

Citizens of Gettysburg in the Aftermath

Care giving isn’t sexy. The history books and movies stick with the big events and vivid bursts of heroism but not what follows (often for a good long time). This author looks into a story of those who picked up the pieces and suffered the fallout.

Wishing you a good Independence Day, knowing that my good wishes don’t change your reality. May some little measure of freedom – from worry, for example – come your way.

Sandra Merville Hart

Confederate cannons at North Carolina Memorial, Gettysburg Battlefield

“We do not know until tried what we are capable of.” Sarah Broadhead, Gettysburg citizen, wrote this on July 7, 1863—just four days after the battle ended.

An undated article in Adams County Sentinel reported that the town was one vast hospital. Wounded soldiers filled churches, colleges, the seminary, the courthouse, and many homes. Houses and barns outside of town were filled with thousands of Rebels, left behind when their army retreated. Citizens were doing everything in their power for them.

The Sanitary Commission took over the Fahnestock store, a one-hundred-foot long building in the center of town. They filled it with provisions and clothing, which were distributed to soldiers in the hospitals. Sarah Broadhead praised the work of both the Sanitary Commission and the Christian Commission. Private contributions enabled both organizations to provide generously for the injured men.

Nellie Auginbaugh remembered…

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Upside Down

Well, not literally.  I’m not flipping the car or other antics described in the last post.

The publisher of my book about the care giving experience occasionally posts excerpts on the web.  One came up today, and it flips into that “upside down” feeling,

I guess it can’t be any other way. There is no magic cure for autism. You have to take in lots of advice and experiment with different approaches because what lifts the life of one autistic kid could be fruitless or even counterproductive with another.

upside down me

Care giving: actual footage.

The universal manual of “normal” parenting fails to help. Normal parenting is to yell if you spot an emergency in progress. But if we’d raised our voices and warned Joey, “Hey, put that down. You’ll put your eye out,” we’d be living with a Cyclops by now. You learn to use soft, reassuring tones to say, “Honey, you’re standing in front of an oncoming bus there. How about standing with Mommy instead?” You find yourself looking at the world upside down.

Care giving is a practice in which common sense and conventional wisdom take frequent beatings.  Which is why I try to share some spiritual perspectives here from time to time.  Misery loves company as it stands on its head, and it also cries out for help that can bring things into perspective.