Sink your teeth into this

A dental hygienist and care giver to a son with autism did a bit of field research on what could help make a visit to the dentist a success for the child and family.

She found five factors, with communication central to the whole effort.  She visualized it this way:

Autism dental

From the linked article.

Note the importance of Parent carer confidence.  There’s the saying that you should be your own advocate when it comes to your medical care.  Caregivers have to advocate for those who rely on our help.  In the case of dental visits, the author of the study found that

Parents expressed a lack of confidence in approaching the dentist when issues arose. They often assumed that the dentist’s education had provided enough training to understand and support individuals who struggled attending dental examinations. For those parents confident enough to ask for minor changes to meet their child’s individual needs, they reported that these requests were often met with reluctance. Therefore, despite their best efforts, dental visits were largely unsuccessful.
Dental teams that took time to respond flexibly to parental requests for support had more positive experiences. Check-ups were also positive when the whole dental team became involved in the care of the child. This was demonstrated by one dental team who discovered a boy’s love for washing machines. There was a washing machine at the practice so the receptionists would take him to see it if the dentist was running late, or after his check-up.
Helpful strategies included providing information on what to expect before a check-up and making thorough notes so parents did not have to repeat themselves at every appointment. This continuity before and after a check-up was really valued by participating families.
When we express the likes, dislikes and needs of those in our care, we find that we can make allies.  Sure, there are people and places that lack flexibility.  It’s up to us to seek out and open up the practices that are supportive.


I’m no Mary, he sure ain’t no Jesus…

When Joey was a toddler and we were at camp, the thought flooded my head like perfectly heated steam, while the sun poured into my skin like soft lotion. Some distant, bitter stranger, more like a stick-figure with a disproportionate index finger pointing at me was saying “That is blasphemy, you fool and you will writhe in the pit of Godless Hell.” My conscience made no sense of that brittle, screeching thing.

My thought was that Joey was Jesus and I was Mary. Well, not really. It was more like it felt so perfect, that the love was so pure that it had to be the same love. I thought of my other two children. Did I love them less? I loved them as much, no second thought. Immaculate Conception? Did any reader who barely knows me remain in their chair at that thought? Lastly, Joey had never spoken but one word: “tickle,” and at the time I did not know he would not begin to speak until he was almost five years old. Nothing exceptional about either of us, to the outside world, rather unnoticeable unless misbehaving. 

Misbehaving? I shall not digress much but a doctor has mended a gash in my cornea after one of Joey’s meltdowns. As for me, it took a couple of exceedingly large women walking slowly, diagonally across a mall parking lot, no crosswalk, not looking, got an earful from me and yes, I was sober. To my husband’s chagrin, I was shotgun. 

Back to camp. Joey was 2 years old. He had been diagnosed with severe autism 2 months earlier. Out here in the open, running, clapping or flapping his hands in the fresh-cut grass, he had very few sensory issues. An “older” mother, I was 41.

Now I am almost 62, Joey is 24 and I am thinking perhaps God needed me to love him as deeply as Mary loved Jesus to get through the years of violence and injury he brought, mostly to me because I was physically the weakest, emotionally the most vulnerable, and although autistic, he was smart-enough to know it.

And if that was not enough there were the “outsiders:” every  wise-ass parent who saw a neuro-typical looking child like mine behaving badly and concluded it was my bad parenting, or the parent of another autistic child who had all the answers… I should not have immunized him as I did my other 2, I should have spent tens of thousands of dollars for some amazing camp run by people who looked like the people who used to hang at Haight-Ashbury which would “cure” him. Lastly, the 6-figure paid government employees who knew nothing about education but decided what kind of help my son and other children like him would not receive. Those meetings were tortuous hours.

I still feel the overpowering love that I can only guess Mary felt for Jesus, who was helpless to the world. Of course it is completely different. Of course it is not.


I’m a little teapot…

Melissa and I just bought  this whistling teapot:


Her social media comment says it all.

The autistic kid moves, the tea kettle whistles after 22 years

We’ve chronicled some of the sensory issues that bedeviled Joey and through him the whole family.  We had to banish whistling teapots from our home for 22 years because the sound distressed him to the point of meltdown.

Hey, it wasn’t all bad.  I mean, I had plenty of opportunities to avoid cleaning the house because the sound of a vacuum put him over the edge.

But the little blue teapot is another sign of our lives being liberated from the concessions, adaptations and drudgeries of care giving.

Hang in there, wherever you are on the care giving journey.  I’ve been slogging through the Biblical Prophet Ezekiel.  The first 39 chapters are a gloomy tale of people living in exile, familiar life erased.

Then one day life starts to come back together.