Silver Roses

An excerpt from our book showed up on our Publisher’s page today.  Hope it helps you get off of your own back.

One year, my wife and I planted roses all around our backyard. If we knew what we were doing, we would tell you that the flowers were called Lady Wilhelmina Sunburst Spectaculars or some such name. The reality is we went to the nursery and said things like, “Oh, let’s get some of those silver ones.”

Sure, we had red roses and yellow roses, but we were really excited by the bush that would give us silver roses. Our friends would stare and sputter, “Wow, silver roses. Never seen those.”

We planted the silver rose bush in a prominent angle of our fence line. It would be the eye-catching star of the backyard. We followed the nursery’s instructions about how deep to dig, how much to water, and whether it liked red or white wine with meals.

Our dog at the time was a burly malamute mix named Rocky. Evidently, he shared our interest in silver roses. We came home one afternoon to find Rocky lying on the grass, gnawing on the dug-up silver rose bush. After much arm-flapping and loud shouts of, “Oh no!” and “Bad dog!” we replanted the bush. Rocky was a good dog and left it alone. A few weeks later, we had our silver roses. That rose bush didn’t pout because a couple of beginning gardeners forgot to protect it from their dog. It just went back to making silver roses.

Our son Joey endured much because his caregivers were medical amateurs. We never spotted warning signs before a seizure caused him to bang his head on a TV stand, making him bleed profusely. He couldn’t tell us that a stomach bug had him dehydrated, and all we could do was watch the emergency room nurses give him an IV to re-inflate him like a tire.

But after incidents like those, he just took up wherever he left off. Our expertise—or lack thereof—didn’t bother him. He went back to his daily routines and loved us just the same. Joey is not what we made him or failed to make him. He’s always carried strengths of his own that we can admire as precious gifts from God.

We are part of a culture that takes responsibility for too much and assumes that our every word, deed, or thought will have a life-altering impact. Caregivers take that warped thinking to another level since we are in constant interaction with people who have special needs, and we assume that we will do them more harm by our perceived failures.

“For we are to God the pleasing aroma of Christ among those who are being saved and those who are perishing. To the one we are an aroma that brings death; to the other, an aroma that brings life. And who is equal to such a task?” (2 Corinthians 2:15-16 NIV).

We are who we are. Others are who they are, too. Our impact on them is dictated as much by their own inner workings as by our intention and skill.

So let’s drop fear of failure from the one hand and fantasy futures from the other and concentrate on taking hold of what is true in the relationships entrusted to us by God in the here and now. Those placed in our care have special needs we can meet, but they are unique people and not just extensions of our lives.

Silver roses are not our creations; they are the beautiful flowers of tough plants.

The Games of the XXIV Joelympiad

Greetings from the evening of Joey’s 24th birthday.

20180225_184237The gang at his new group home made a card and all the residents and staff signed.  They were all very smiley as they shared it with me when I picked Joey up to have dinner, gifts and an evening with mom and dad.

One of the staff also baked a cake which Joey devoured for lunch before we drove off.  OK, I had a piece, too.  Seemed the courteous thing to do, and you know that caregivers are all about modeling good social skills.

We took Joe out to a favorite place for the evening meal.

 

Back here at the house, mom offered him a couple of requested videos, but ONLY after he read “Happy 24th Birthday Joey” off the gift bag.

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Here he is inspecting the gifts.

 

 

 

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And here he is after much exhortation to let me get a pic.  Smile not included.

 

 

 

Not sure he’s watched either movie just yet.  He’s pacing around the house processing things, although he just said, “Coming soon to a theater near you.”

We went so far as to unlock the cabinet in which sits his VCR.  We are so happy with his progress in this new year of life that we’re willing to let him go back to pushing rewind over and over and over and over and over and…

Well, for one night.  It’s his birthday, after all.

Waiting for the other one to drop.

I went over to our son’s group home to pick him up for an overnight here.  Nice evening, got his hair cut, had lots of pizza with friends, the good things in life.

But the big news is what happened when I picked him up.  A staff person at the house said, “Joey, your dad’s here.  Get ready to go.”

Lo and behold, Joey went into his room and came out a moment later HAVING PUT ON HIS OWN SHOES.

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Yeah, those black ones on the top of the pile!  They were on his feet!  All by themselves or something!

That’s something we weren’t able to get him to do for 23 years, and in just a few weeks of living with a bit of independence (and housemates who won’t be manipulated into doing it all for him) he can “shoe” himself.

And that’s not all.  He’s using pronouns and grammar more appropriately.

Most of all, he’s smiling a whole lot on these visits.  He’s not disoriented by changes in routine like he used to be.

Next week’s his 24th birthday.  Looking forward to having him over for a celebration.

Death and that other stuff

So yesterday I did my taxes.  Well, I compiled all the stuff so a tax pro could do tax pro voodoo with it.

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Screen grab from my personal Facebook page.

Tax time gives me mixed feelings.

Yes, it’s a pain with our over-complicated system, built for those with the means to manipulate and a money vacuum stuck in the pockets of working people.  So I grumble.

But because all kinds of people all over the place pay taxes, there are various programs that make life gentler for our son with autism, and that ease our burdens as caregivers.  So I give thanks.

But more than all of this is the fact that I had to download and print a number of documents.  THIS is where I felt the impact of decades as a caregiver.

See, our son likes to grab pieces of paper, crumble them up and wave them in moments of self-stimulation.  As a result we used to keep all of our bills and documents secure, and we never, ever, ever left paper in the exposed printer feed tray.

So yesterday, after printing the 1095 and the mortgage interest thingy and such, I took all the paper out of the feed tray and hid it in a file cabinet.  Even though our son doesn’t live here anymore.  

Care giving.  A gift that keeps giving.  With all the certainty of death and… and… what was I talking about?