Flashing before my eyes

Not my life, but my son’s life.  That’s what flashing before my eyes.

Today we have the meeting to set up his move to a group home.  All of the staff will be there, both the folks from his day program and from the house where he will live.

It’s a positive thing, of course, something for which we’ve (my wife and I) waited for a long time.

I can’t speak for her feelings, and I can only guess at our son’s, so I’ll shift to first person here.

I realize that my role in my son’s life is not over, but much of what I can do and shape is.  I’ve formed what I can in his life, second guessed myself to the point of agony, been critiqued and judged plenty from without, as well as encouraged and supported at precious points along the way.

I can look back on…

 

JOEY Yucaipa

 

…who Joey was…

 

 

Daves mom and joe

 

 

…who he’s become…

 

 

 

20170723_110957

 

 

…and ponder who he’ll be.

 

 

 

 

Something of me travels with him, of course.  And I pray that it is whatever is true, whatever is honourable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is pleasing, whatever is commendable (Philippians 4:8).  God knows and every day reminds me that there’s plenty of me that needs to be ignored and forgotten, and I can only pray that little of that drags along with Joey.

So a new leg of the journey commences, over territory we’ve not been and over which we’ll have ever diminishing control.  But ain’t that life.

An old priest I knew always included a warning in his message at the baptism of a child.  You (parents) know that you’re handing your child over to God now.  You’re no longer in charge of the outcomes.

As my life flashes before my eyes, and Joey’s plays across my imagination, I’ll trust that warning, and know that all of our lives are in the hands of the One who’s cared for us beyond all deserving.

 They will declare,  “The Lord is just!  He is my rock!  There is no evil in him!”  (Psalm 92:15, NLT)

Let Me Hold Your hand Through Life My Son (Autism and other things too) by Zanele Dlamini 

The mother of an adult son with autism processes her thoughts and emotions by composing a letter to him.

David Snape and Friends - The place to show off your hidden talents

A mother’s promise to her autistic boy on his eighteenth birthday..

If I could turn back time, my baby boy, I would rub out Autism from your life.I would be flying around doing superhero things that would give you a better start in life. Give you all the tools to survive this world on your own.Now that you are an adult. There is so much that I wish you knew. So much I wish I could tell you about people and relationships. There is so much you need to know about love (girls too), pain, abandonment and loneliness. If only you could understand.

My son, I want you know that I cried today when you were diagnosed with yet another mental health problem. It is like you are in a fighting ring and the punches keep coming from all sides. I had to allow doctors to inject you for the…

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It’s on

Here’s the latest on our 23 year old son with autism’s transition to a group residence:

Yes, we have a pre-move team meeting next week and a move in date of November 1, per this message from the Case Manager,

Hello Team,

Joey and I would like to invite you to his ISP Pre-move meeting.

Date: Friday, September 22nd, 2017
Time: 3:30pm
Location: XXXXX Conference Room 3

The purpose of this meeting is to discuss supports Joey will need during his transition to the XXXXX house.

Melissa (mom) is working with Joey on feeling more comfortable with his new computer, which will move with him. He hates change so this was a heck of a time for his old desktop to go kaput.

His most recent antic was to unplug the new laptop, take it off the desk and plop it by its purchase box to say, “Send it back.”

Melissa coached him on being more at home with it, and they had a good discussion one recent morning before his bus arrived and a good hands on lesson last night.

I’m off today and we are planning to go to a sports bar that Joey likes because it is roomy and has great burgers.

Which gave Melissa leverage when he didn’t want his computer lesson. All she had to say was “Working for cheeseburgers.” He complied.

It’s on. The computer is on. The move is on.

Meanwhile the dog did some neurotic paw gnawing last night, opened a wound, and thus cancelled her scheduled bath and grooming.

That’s care giving. Deal with one issue, and the next one comes up from somewhere, somehow.

Seasons change

Joey Tree picOur son brought home this autumn tree art from his day program.  We put it up to catch some natural light.

It is timely, as next month (still, for the moment, unless there’s another change, hopefully) is his move into a group home setting and our overdue commencement of empty nesting.

Changing seasons, each with their own simultaneous losses and beauties.  And mysteries for later revelation.

For everything there is a season, and a time for every matter under heaven: 
a time to be born, and a time to die;
a time to plant, and a time to pluck up what is planted; 
a time to kill, and a time to heal;
a time to break down, and a time to build up; 
a time to weep, and a time to laugh;
a time to mourn, and a time to dance; 
a time to throw away stones, and a time to gather stones together;
a time to embrace, and a time to refrain from embracing; 
a time to seek, and a time to lose;
a time to keep, and a time to throw away; 
a time to tear, and a time to sew;
a time to keep silence, and a time to speak; 
a time to love, and a time to hate;
a time for war, and a time for peace.

Ecclesiastes 3:1-8

 

Don’t Call Us

Our publisher’s site features a bit from our book today.

If you are grappling with frustration, especially if it’s born of perfectionism and the constant setbacks of care giving, you might find this little selection useful.

pathetic-7If our efforts to raise houseplants have been hit and miss, imagine some of the misadventures of raising a son with autism. Caregiving provides instant and constant experiences of inadequacy. Just as we’ve tried various strategies to keep the plants growing, we’ve sought out an array of therapies, settings, medications, specialists, diets and more to bring out the best in Joey’s life. And even with all that help, there are plenty of withered efforts to report.

It’s not all gloom and doom.  Some of the spiritual uplift (we hope) of the book comes in as well.

Hoping you have some good growth and blooming amid all your fails and weeds today.